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SWRE News A cooperative day in YOUR life


So how did you spend your day? Chances are cooperatives were a big part of it from dawn until bedtime. Take a moment to read this quick overview of how co-ops might be impacting you every day. Your morning orange juice might be from Florida’s


Natural, a producer-owned


cooperative based in – you guessed it – Florida, but distributing throughout the U.S. If your morning coffee came from Equal Exchange, you get bonus points because they source their coffee from farmer-owned co-ops in developing countries, and they are a worker-owned co-op. The wheat in your muffin or toast was likely processed through a farmer-owned grain elevator in the Midwest. If you had cranberries in that muffin, they likely came from Ocean Spray, or maybe you used Land O’Lakes Butter or Welch’s Concord Grape Jam – all producer-owned co-ops that make the products we love on our toast. After that big co-op breakfast, it is time to start our day.


The shirt or dress that you wear may be made from cotton that was produced, processed and marketed by farmer co-ops. Perhaps this is the day to make some improvements to your home.


Ace


Hardware, True Value and Do It Best are all examples of purchasing co-ops. These are small businesses that come together to form a co-op so that they can compete with big box retailers that are not owned by people in the local community. You might need to stop by a credit union for a loan or pick up some cash for that


home project from one of the 25,000 ATMs in their network. More than 100 million people in the U.S. are members of a credit union, and, yep, you guessed it – credit unions are co-ops.


On your way home you may stop at one of the 300 community-owned cooperative grocery stores in the country. Many of the meat products and vegetables are also sourced from co-ops. If you are in a hurry, you may swing by


KFC, Taco Bell, or Pizza Hut to pick up dinner. The francise owners of these fast food restaurants are all members of a purchasing co-op, just like the hardware stores above. So are the owners of Dunkin Donuts and many other franchises. After dinner, perhaps you are watching TV from one of the more than 1,000 small cable companies that serve rural America that have come together to form a co-op that helps keep costs as low as possible. Or maybe you are talking on a telephone or surfing the Internet


through services


provided by your local telecommunications co-op. Travel plans? If you are on a business trip or vacation and staying in a Best Western – that is also a purchasing co-op. And when it’s time for “lights out”, you can flip the switch knowing you’re receiving safe, reliable electricity from your local member-owned electric company – Southwest Rural Electric. From morning until night, you can have a very cooperative day!


Adam Schwartz, writer of this article, is founder of The Cooperative Way, a national consulting firm that helps co-ops succeed.


What’s Cookin’ in the SWRE Kitchen Pecan Butterscotch Bars


¾ cup (1-1/2 sticks) butter 2 cups dark brown sugar 1-1/2 cups flour 1 tsp. salt


Directions


1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and grease a 9x9-inch pan (or double the recipe and use a 9x13-inch pan)


2. In a small saucepan over low heat, melt the butter. Add the brown sugar and stir. 3. In a medium bowl, mix the flour, salt, and baking powder. 4. Pour the butter-sugar mixture into the flour mixture and stir until combined. Add the egg and vanilla and stir well. Add ½ cup of the nuts and stir. 5. Pour the batter into the pan. Sprinkle the remaining nuts on top and pat them into place.


6. Bake for about 25-30 minutes. They may look underdone, but they’ll be chewy and delicious when cool.


2 tsp. baking powder 2 eggs


2 tsp. vanilla extract 1 cup chopped Pecans


October 2015 SWRE News


Joe Wynn, SWRE News editor Board of Trustees


Dan White, Pres. ................ District 7 Don Ellis, Vice Pres. ........... District 1 Don Proctor, Sec. ............... District 3 Dan Lambert ....................... District 2 Ray Walker ......................... District 4 Dan Elsener ........................ District 5 Ronnie Swan ...................... District 6 Carl Brockriede ................... District 8 Jimmy Holland .................... District 9


Southwest Rural Electric Assn. P.O. Box 310


700 North Broadway Tipton, OK 73570-0310 1-800-256-7973


SWRE News is published monthly for distribution to members of South- west Rural Electric Association.


SWRE Statement of Non-Discrimination


Southwest Rural Electric Association, Inc., is the recipient of federal finance assistance from the Rural Utilities Service, an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and is subject to the provisions of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, the Age Discrimination Act of 1975, as amended, and the rules and regulations of the U.S. Department of Agriculture which provide that no person in the United States on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age or handicap shall be excluded from participation in, admission or access to, denied the benefits of, or otherwise be subjected to discrimination under any of this organization’s programs or activities.


The person responsible for coordinating


nondiscrimination compliance efforts is Mike R. Hagy,


this


may obtain further information about the statutes and regulations listed above from and/or file a written complaint with this organization; or the


Executive Officer. Any individual, or specific class of individuals, who feels that this organization has subjected


organization’s Chief


them to


Service, 1400 Independence Avenue SW, Rm 1535, STOP 1510, Washington, D.C. 20250-1535; or call (202) 720-9540 or Fax (202) 720-1725. Or the Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, D.C. 20250-9410; or call (866) 632-9992 to request a form. Fax the form to (202) 690-7442. USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. Complaints must be filed within 180 days


Administrator, Rural Utilities


discrimination. Confidentiality will be maintained to the extent possible.


after the alleged discrimination


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