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Registration tops 1,800 Ri i A 8


Story by Clint Branham Photos by Clint Branham and Vern Spain


nother picture-perfect, late- summer day drew throngs of


rural electric coopera ve members to a end Northeast Oklahoma Electric’s 78th annual mee ng. The 2016 event—held Saturday, September 17 at the Grove Civic Center—saw 1,806 member households register. Thousands more, including family members and friends, also enjoyed the many sights and sounds at this year’s REC Day, making the occasion an overwhelming success.


“I had the dis nct privilege of visi ng with many coopera ve members during the 78th REC annual mee ng, and many of the individuals I met were a ending their fi rst-ever annual mee ng,” remarked Anthony Due, NEOEC General Manager.” Everyone to whom I spoke seemed to really be enjoying themselves with all the food, fun and music.”


Even though they were not required to stay once registered, the Civic Center auditorium was packed with members curious to hear results from both the elec on and prize drawings.


“The prizes are always a big hit with the members and I no ced that quite a large number stayed right up un l the fi nal drawing,” said Due.


Quorum was offi cially fulfi lled at 10:52 a.m. with the registra on of A on resident Deanna Gordon. Gordon was the 1,443rd member to register on the day, marking the fi ve percent member par cipa on required to make the mee ng offi cial. She received a Cra smen Mul -Tool for helping the coopera ve achieve quorum. Northeast Oklahoma Electric Coopera ve has now achieved quorum at its annual mee ng 18 years consecu vely, da ng back to 1999.


This year’s REC Day carried a Bedlam football theme and a endees enjoyed a wide variety of ac vi es. Along with an opportunity to par cipate in the coopera ve’s unique democra c process by vo ng in the trustee elec on, there were numerous prize giveaways, complimentary food and beverages, low-cost health screenings furnished by friendly Craig General Hospital staff , co-op member/vendor displays, arts and cra s booths, and the always-popular Kid Zone. Performances by both Paul Bogart on the indoor stage and Reverse Reac on on the outdoor stage kept the crowd entertained throughout the day.


During the elec on por on of the mee ng, members in a endance were asked to assist


the coopera ve in deciding the outcome of two runoff s for seats on the coopera ve board, as well as confi rming the nomina on of one incumbent trustee running unopposed. A er the creden als commi ee had tallied the votes, coopera ve a orney Michael Torrone shared the results of the general elec on with members in a endance at the business mee ng.


Torrone reported that a total of 1,725 ballots had been cast during elec on proceedings, adding that Jim Wade had his unopposed nomina on for the District 7 trustee seat confi rmed with 1,522 votes. In the fi rst of two runoff s, meanwhile, Torrone reported that incumbent Benny Seabourn retained his District 2 seat by a margin of 929 votes to 725 votes for challenger Andy Stewart. In the second runoff , it was reported by Torrone that incumbent Jimmy Caudill retained his District 9 seat by a margin of 1,004 votes to 680 votes for challenger Doug Cox.


Numerous prizes were presented to coopera ve members at the conclusion of the mee ng. Of the many prizes awarded, $500 electric credits went to nine members (one per coopera ve district). Winners were: Robert Cline of Miami (District 1), Jason Faul of Fairland (District 2), Herbert Morris of


>> November 2016 - 5


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