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Vol. 68 Number 1


News orthwestern Electric November 2016


This November, let your voice be heard H


ow many times have you heard, or even made the state- ment, “Who, me? Vote? Why


bother! I’m only one person, and it doesn’t make a difference anyway.” Imagine if your state and federal representatives had this attitude when it came time for them to cast a vote on a critical piece of legislation. In all likelihood, they wouldn’t remain in office for very long. This is because most Americans feel their elected officials have the responsibility to vote and represent them on issues of public policy.


As a citizen of the United States, it is just as much your responsibility and your job to elect the people who will determine the laws and policies that govern your life and your livelihood. Tuesday, Nov. 8, is your day—your day to vote, your day to make your voice heard on the issues important to you and your fam- ily, your community, and the country. Low voter turnout has been a topic of conversation for the last several election cycles. Since the 1960s, voter turnout during presidential elections has seen a steady decline—with the occasional uptick here and there. In the 2016 primary election cycle, voter


turnout in most states was only 21 to 30 percent, and this was a record year for primary voter turnout!


Some speculate the reason for the decline is because the average Ameri- can is not as engaged in politics as they have been in the past. And who can blame us really? Often times, we may feel like candidates are not speak-


ing to the issues we care about. Or perhaps we don’t feel like we under- stand enough about the candidates’ stances on the issues, or even the issues themselves. But we can change this.


Earlier this year, we joined other cooperatives across America in the Co-ops Vote effort to help boost voter turnout. Co-ops Vote is a non-partisan campaign with one simple goal: in- crease voter turnout at the polls this November.


CO-OPS OTE OKLAHOMA


A PR OGR AM OF AMERICA'S ELECTRIC COOPER A TIVES WWW.VOTE.COOP


Inside


Smart meters.................2 Missing members.........3 Recipe............................3 Thank a vet....................4 Rebate program............4


We want to see civic engagement in our rural communities increase. We want to give you what you need to make informed decisions about candidates at all levels of government, not just the presidential race. And we want you to know more about the is- sues that could impact our local com- munities. (7979001) The Co-ops Vote initiative offers information on the candidates running and explanations of eight key issues that are important to the health and prosperity of communities served by electric cooperatives: • Rural Broadband Access • Hiring and Honoring Veterans • Low-Income Energy Assistance • Cybersecurity


• Water Regulation • Rural Health Care Access • Affordable and Reliable Energy • Renewable Energy


Before you cast your vote on Nov. 8, we encourage you to visit the Co- ops Vote website, www.vote.coop, to learn more about the candidates and the issues that impact us locally. Let’s work together to improve our com- munities by increasing voter turnout and changing our country, one vote at a time.


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