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Cimarron Electric Cooperative Inside this issue


* Mr. H.H. Williams * Tip of the Month. * Fall Back one hour.


* Classifieds.


* CEC Holiday Schedule. * 1249 Mile Project.


* First Aide and CPR Training * Call 811 Before Digging. * Signs and Safety.


Cimarron Electric Centenarian


Mr. Horace Williams is a Centenarian! Also know as H.H., Mr. Williams is 100 years, 6 months old! He was born on May 3rd, 1916. Horace explained their family’s roots in Oklahoma. After his uncle made the land run and staked out his 160 acres N. of Marshall in 1889, his dad, E.H.Williams moved here from Kansas a year later and bought out the claim south of his brothers.


That’s the land where H.H. was born. He was the baby of the family. 3 brothers and 3 sisters came before him. He was about 13 years old when the great depres- sion hit. “It was rough times back then”, said H.H., “I remember dad selling cows for $35. Even though my brother and I didn’t have chairs and stood at the sup- per table, I don’t ever remember us going hungry. Our folks were good providers. I do remember the huge dust storms coming from the west back then.”


H.H. started Douglas High School in 1930 and gradu- ated in 1935. Back then work was a necessity and school was scheduled around planting and harvest- ing. Doc Voskuhl of Kingfisher was 9 yrs. younger than me and grew up around Mar- shall. He worked on our family farm


Horace (H.H.) and Jaunita Williams. August 1940


some before becoming a veterinarian. He was a close friend.


H.H. was around 20 years old when Ci- marron Electric Cooperative was formed. It was started as Consumer’s Rural Electric Company. It was quite the deal to hear people talk about getting electricity. We were not in the first group to get elec- tricity. The first poles and wires were all south of the Cimarron River over by Kingfisher.


Horace (H.H.) Williams


I saw the Hindenburg fly over our farm


In 1940, H.H. married Jaunita Burner. They started house keeping on the homestead farm with no electric- ity. H.H. remembers they had kerosene lanterns and a kerosene refrigerator. They had a pot bellied stove to cook on and heat the house. “I remember we had a gold fish in a bowl. Sometimes in the morning, the water was frozen until we got the fire going. He was a tough little fish.


(Continued on page 6)


November 2016 www.cimarronelectric.com


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