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Oklahoma Events Prairie Flavors P By Laura Araujo Pretty Pies


ie is often thought of as an all-American dessert. But did you know pie existed long before America did? Pie is believed to be the invention of the Greeks; it later became popular in Roman culture. Meat pies were common in England in the 16th and 17th centuries. When Colonists traveled to America, they brought meat pies


with them. Pie was an everyday dish, a way to stretch food when it was not plentiful. We may picture the fi rst Thanksgiving with pumpkin and pecan pies on the table, but it wasn’t until much later that pie became popular for dessert. Today, pies of various types can be found on most holiday dessert tables. This November, enjoy these pie recipes and visit Oklahoma Living’s digital edition at www.ok-living.coop for more.


Caramel Apple Pie Yields 1 pie


2 chilled piecrusts


2 tablespoons lemon juice 3 pounds apples, peeled and cored ¼ cup brown sugar ¼ cup cornstarch 2 teaspoons cinnamon 1 cup caramel bits 2 tablespoons butter, cubed 1 egg, beaten Coarse sugar


Preheat the oven to 400°F. Roll out one crust into an 11-inch circle, about 1/8-inch thick, and place it into a 9-inch pie pan. Trim any excess crust at the outside edge of the pie pan. Poke the bottom and sides with a fork and freeze the


Turkey Pot Pie Yields 1 pie


2 chilled piecrusts


3 cups diced or shredded turkey* 8 ounces frozen mixed peas and carrots, thawed and drained


2 cups frozen sweet corn, thawed and drained, or 1 can, drained 2 cans cream of chicken soup 1 soup can 2 percent or whole milk 1 egg, beaten


Preheat the oven to 400°F. Roll out one crust into a 12-inch circle, about 1/8-inch thick, and place it into a 9-inch pie pan. Poke the bottom and sides with a fork and freeze the crust. In a


crust. Roll out the second crust. To create a decorative top crust, use a fl oured 2-inch cook- ie cutter to cut out about 40 shapes (circles, fl owers, leaves, etc.). Place the cutouts on a bak- ing sheet and freeze. Pour the lemon juice into a large bowl. Cut the apples into uniform slices and place them in the bowl; toss with the lem- on juice. To the apples, add the brown sugar, cornstarch, cinnamon, caramel bits and butter; toss to coat. Dump the apples into the frozen bottom crust. Starting at edge of the pan, place the cutouts around the edge, slightly overlap- ping them; use a pastry brush to brush each piece with the beaten egg. Sprinkle coarse sugar over the fi nished crust. Place the pie pan on a baking sheet and bake for 40 minutes; reduce the oven temperature to 350°F and continue baking for 15 minutes. Allow the pie to set up for 20 to 30 minutes before serving.


Caramel Apple Pie Photos by Laura Araujo


Turkey Pot Pie Turkey Pot Pie


medium bowl, mix the turkey, vegetables, soup and milk. Pour into the frozen crust. Roll out the top crust. Place it on top of the fi lled pie pan. Trim the top and bottom crusts, leaving about an inch of overhang. Fold both crusts under and tuck them into the pan. Crimp the edges of the crust. If desired, cut teardrop-shaped leaves out of excess dough; use the dull side of a knife to create veins on the leaves. Decorate the top of the pie with the leaves, brush the crust with egg wash, and cut steam holes in it. Place the pie pan on a baking sheet and bake for 35 minutes; reduce the heat to 350°F and bake for 20 more minutes. Allow the pie to set up for 20 to 30 minutes before serving. *Note: shredded or diced chicken can be substituted for the turkey.


If viewing our digital edition, click here to view more Prairie Flavors’ pie recipes. Access our digital edition at www.ok-living. coop or fi nd our FREE app at the Apple Newsstand Google Play or Amazon.


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