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WINTER IS COMING Is Your Home Ready?


Make sure both your home and your heating system are prepared for chilly weather with a little preventive maintenance. Brad Kendrick, Choctaw Electric energy use specialist, encourages co-op members to give their home and Heating Ventilation Air Conditioner (HVAC) system a thorough checkup to ensure the best savings on monthly energy bills. Do these tasks now before winter arrives and again in the spring. To visit with Kendrick about other ways you can save on energy costs, please call 800-780-6496, ext. 209


Give Your HVAC A Timely Tuneup


equipment in need of repair before the entire system breaks. It can also reveal problems that could cost you extra money in energy loss.


M


A typical maintenance check-up includes:


• Tightening electrical connections and measuring voltage and current on motors. Faulty electrical connections can cause unsafe operation of your system and reduce the life of major components.


• Lubrication of all moving parts. Parts that lack lubrication cause friction in motors and increase the amount of electricity you use.


• Inspection of the condensate drain in your central air conditioner, furnace and/or heat pump (when in cooling mode). A plugged drain can cause water damage in the house and affect indoor humidity levels.


aintenance on an HVAC system can uncover faulty


• Checking controls of the system to ensure proper and safe operation. Check the starting cycle of the equipment to assure the system starts, operates and shuts off properly.


• Cleaning evaporator and condenser coils. Dirty coils reduce the system’s ability to cool your home and cause the system to run longer, increasing energy costs and reducing the life of the equipment.


• Checking central AC refrigerant level and adjust if necessary. Too much or too little refrigerant will make your system less efficient, increasing energy costs and reducing the life of the equipment.


• Cleaning and adjusting blower components to provide proper system airflow for greater comfort levels. Airflow problems can reduce your system’s efficiency by up to 15 percent.





Do you need a pro? Talk to your co-op about scheduling a free energy audit for your home. Energy audits help you understand how your home is using energy and where possible problems exist that can cost you money. To schedule an audit, call, 800-780-6486, ext. 209.


Weatherproof your house W


ant to save money on your energy bills this winter? Begin with sealing leaks in your home. Even the tiniest gaps around windows, doors, light fixtures, electrical


outlets and air ducts can slowly let your home’s heated air escape to the outdoors. That can add up to substantial heat loss.


Here’s how to avoid leaks: •


Caulk throughout the house wherever walls meet floors or door frames, and between the outside of the window frame and the siding. Choose caulk designed for the surface you’re caulking, and try a higher quality caulk, which will last longer.


Apply weather-stripping to all exterior doors and windows. Weather-stripping is a thin piece of material that seals the gap between where the door or window meets the jamb. Self-stick foam pieces are quick and easy to apply.


• Replace worn door sweeps on exterior doors to help prevent heat loss under the door.


• Seal windows with thin plastic sheets using an insulator kit. Shrinking the plastic film with a hair dryer ensures a smooth and tight seal.


HOME ENERGY AUDIT✔


6 | NOVEMBER 2016 | CEC Inside Your Co-op


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