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inside your co•op


A monthly newsletter of Choctaw Electric Cooperative.


BOARD OF TRUSTEES


Brent Franks, President Joe M. Silk, Vice President


Mike Brewer, Secretary Treasurer Stacy Nichols


George Burns Ken Autry


Bill Woolsey


Norman Ranger Becky Franks


MANAGEMENT AND STAFF


Kenneth J. Gates, Chief Executive Officer Jennifer Smith, Executive Assistant Jia Johnson, Director of Public Relations Craig McBrain, Chief Financial Officer Jim Malone, Director of Operations Darrell Ward, System Services Manager


HUGO OFFICE PO Box 758 Hwy 93 North


Hugo, Oklahoma 74743


Toll Free: (800) 780-6486 Local: (580) 326-6486 FAX (580) 326-2492


Monday-Friday • 8 am - 5 pm IDABEL OFFICE


2114 SE Washington Idabel, Oklahoma 74745


Toll Free: (800) 780-6486 Local: (580) 286-7155


Monday-Friday • 8 am - 5 pm


ANTLERS OFFICE HC 67 Box 62


Antlers, Oklahoma 74523 (One mile east of Antlers)


Toll Free: (800) 780-6486 Local: (580) 298-3201


Monday-Friday • 8 am - 5 pm On the Web:


www.choctawelectric.coop


24 Hour Outage Hotline 800-780-6486


2 | NOVEMBER 2016 | CEC Inside Your Co-op FIND IT ONLINE


f you attended the CEC Annual Meeting, you know why attendance was especially important this year. CEC asked members to decide on bylaw amendments and trustees that will govern the co-op. Without a quorum of members present, this important business would not have taken place.


I


A special thanks to members who attended this year. Thanks, also, to those of you who took advantage of CEC's first ever mail-in ballots. When all was said and done, our third party voting company counted a total of 951 ballots. That's seven percent of CEC's 13,281 accounts.


BY KENNETH J. GATES cHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


One Vote At A Time MANAGEMENT PERSPECTIVE


Some speculate the reason voters don't vote nowadays is because they simply aren't interested in politics. Maybe the candidates aren't speaking to the issues we care about. Or perhaps we don’t feel like we understand the candidates’ stances on the issues, or even the issues themselves. But we can change this.


To help voters feel more engaged in the process, electric co-ops created Coops Vote. It's a non-


partisan campaign with a simple goal: increase voter turnout at the polls this November. By visiting vote.coop, you can learn about your political candidates, access voter registration information and more.


In the future, I would like to see that number increase because voting shows that members care enough about their co-op to cast a ballot. The same can be said about our state and national elections.


With a few exceptions here and there, voter turnout during presidential elections has declined since the 1960s. In the 2016 primary election cycle, voter turnout in most states was only 21 to 30 percent. Oklahoma saw a higher turnout with 39.5 percent of registered voters voting in the presidential primaries. These numbers, less than half of registered voters, actually set records for being the highest in recent years!


We encourage you to visit vote.coop and take the pledge to learn more about the issues that impact us as a nation, as a state and right here at home. Whether voting for a cooperative trustee or a presidential candidate, your vote counts.


Let’s work together to improve our communities by increasing voter turnout and changing our country, one vote at a time.


■ Connect with Savings. Choctaw Electric's Co-op Connections


card provides members with multiple ways to save money. Use it at the pharmacy to save on prescriptions, dental visits, eyeglasses and more. It's also good for savings at hundreds of participating retails stores, restaurants and hotels. Find out how you can save with Co-op


Connections at www.choctawelectric.coop. Click on Member Services, and then Co-op Connections.


CEC


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