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commentary currents Cash Rebates Available


Install an all all-electric, energy efficient geothermal heat pump and qualify for a rebate from your co-op of up to $1,000 per ton.


To qualify, units must have a minimum seasonal energy efficiency rating (SEER) of 18.5 and a coefficient of performance (COP) of 3.6. The rebate applies to geothermal heat pump installations in new homes, conversion from a gas furnace, or upgrades from an air-source heat pump. Geothermal units with a gas back-up system qualify for the air-source rebate rate of $175/ton.


Kiwash Electric also offers rebates of electric water heaters for first time installations or when converting from propane or natural gas to electric. The following qualifications apply:


• Water heaters with an energy factor of .93 or greater receive a $120 rebate.


• Units with an energy factor below .93 receive a $90 rebate.


• Units 40 gallons or larger, with an energy factor greater than 0.9, receive a $50 rebate.


Be sure to save the proof of purchase, installation receipt, and energy efficiency rating information—you will need it to apply for the rebate.


For more details, please visit www. kiwash.coop or call 888-832-3362.


No Deposit To


Transfer Service If you’re moving to a new location on Kiwash lines and have good credit, you can transfer your service without paying another deposit.


To transfer service, please call (888) 832-3362 with the following information: your account number, date of disconnect if applicable, new service location and mailing address.


2 | MAY 2015 | Kilowatt Be Safe By Being Aware W


e drive to work, school, or the store every day, and we begin to take for granted speed limit


signs, bill boards or buildings. Things we see every day can almost fade from view. But failure to notice high voltage power lines can be a deadly oversight. With National Electrical Safety Month taking place in May, now is an excellent time to raise awareness about the dangers of overhead power lines and the precautions to take around them.


Many western Oklahomans are active, outdoor-type people. We are farmers, ranchers, hikers, kite flyers, boaters, and hunters. During outdoor activities, we don’t even think about power lines, but taking a few moments to become aware of your surroundings is a critical step to keeping yourself and your loved ones safe.


We encourage everyone to follow these guidelines as you prepare to work outdoors this year:


Look up and around you. Always be aware of the location of power lines, particularly when using long metal tools like ladders, pool skimmers and tree pruning equipment. Lower your long equipment when you are moving it. Carry ladders and other long items horizontally whenever possible. Kite flyers please keep kites and string far away from electric lines.


Be careful when working on or around your roof, installing rooftop antennas and satellite dishes, doing roof repair work or cleaning gutters. Avoid roof top work in bad weather.


Be especially careful when working near power lines attached to your house. Never trim trees near power lines – leave that to the professionals. Never use water or blower extensions to clean gutters near electric lines. Contact a professional contractor.


Never climb trees near power lines. Even if the power lines aren’t touching the tree, they could touch when more weight is added to the branch.


Never assume the location or depth of underground utilit lines. If your projects include digging, like building a deck or planting a tree, call 811 and allow Kiwash to locate underground lines before you begin. This service is free, prevents the inconvenience of having utilities interrupted, and can help you avoid serious injury.


Stay in the car if you crash into power lines. In vehicle accidents that bring down power lines, our instincts tell us to flee danger. However, it’s almost always best to stay in your vehicle and wait for help.


If you must get out because of fire or another danger, jump clear of the vehicle without touching the vehicle and the ground at the same time. Then hop with feet together —don’t run or stride.


Electricity spreads out through the ground in ripples, like a stone dropped in water. The voltage is highest in the ring closest to the vehicle and decreases with distance. Hop with feet together so that one foot won’t be in a higher voltage zone than another, which could make you a conductor for electricity!


If you come upon, or witness an accident involving toppled power poles and lines, don’t leave your vehicle to approach the accident scene. Often our inclination is to step in and help those in danger and offer assistance to the injured. However, in accidents involving power poles, the best thing you can do is call for help. Wait for trained assistance to arrive, or you could become an additional victim in need of rescue.


Be safe all year long by being aware of your surroundings.


BY DENNI S KRUEGER G E N E R A L M A N A G E R


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