This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Keep Electrical Outlets Safe


It does not take a lot of voltage to cause electrical shock or injury,


Kenny Guffey, director of loss control for the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives (OAEC), says. In fact, one of the most dangerous sources of electrical contact can be found in every home—the electrical receptacle, or “outlet” as it is often called. It is important to keep outlets covered to prevent young children from sticking their fi ngers or other objects into them. Older kids should be reminded that inserting a con- ductive object into a receptacle is dangerous. “The biggest cause of electrical accidents, the one that causes the most deaths per year, is the normal 120-volt outlet,” Justin Glazier, Cimarron Electric Cooperative director of safety and compliance says. “People don’t hear about those usually. The accidents we normally hear about are the big, high-voltage accidents.” Glazier enjoys teaching third-graders in the Cimarron Electric


Cooperative territory about electrical safety through the co-op’s Safety Rangers program. He uses an electrifi ed farm set to demonstrate poten- tial dangers of electricity in and around the home. “It’s a lot of fun. The kids are really talkative and they all have a story. I enjoy teaching them about electrical safety,” Glazier says. In addition to conductive objects, electrical appliances with frayed


cords should not be plugged into a receptacle. Oklahoma Electric Cooperative (OEC) Communications Specialist Tory Tedder-Loffl and teaches elementary students the difference between conductors and in- sulators during the co-op’s safety program, Do Watts Wise. She explains the rubber coating on an appliance’s electrical wires serves as an insula- tor. But when a cord is frayed, the wires become exposed and can cause shock or more severe injury.


Another common outlet hazard is overloading outlets by plugging more than two cords into one receptacle. In today’s age of electronic devices—cell phones, tablets, computers, game consoles and more—it is easy to run out of outlet space. But overloading outlets can cause spark- ing or even a fi re. According to Larry Mattox, director of communications for Central


Rural Electric Cooperative (CREC), the solution for overloaded outlets is not an extension cord. Extension cords are meant for temporary use only. Instead, unplug unused devices or use a power strip.


Left: Oklahoma Electric Cooperative (OEC) safety course teaches kids about the dangers of downed power lines. Photo courtesy of OEC Right: Koyah Littleman learns outdoor electrical safety hazards kids should avoid from Billie Been, member services representative at East Central Oklahoma Electric Cooperative. Photo by Laura Araujo


Safety School


Alfalfa Electric Cooperative Safety Smart | second- and third-graders


Central Rural Electric Cooperative Be Safety Smart | fi rst- and second-graders


Cimarron Electric Cooperative Safety Rangers | third-graders Tractor Driving School | electrical safety for drivers Blaine County Safety Day | fourth- to sixth-graders


Choctaw Electric Cooperative Kilowatt Kids Camp | fi rst- to third- graders | each June


East Central Electric Cooperative Electric Junction | fi rst-graders


Indian Electric Cooperative Safe City | third- and fourth-graders EXTREME Electrical Safety | fi fth-grade to adult


Northwestern Electric Cooperative Making Accidents Disappear | elementary students Watts Up | summer day camp for kids


Oklahoma Electric Cooperative Do Watts Wise | elementary students Get Charged | fi fth- to ninth-graders


Tri-County Electric Cooperative LiveLine Safety Demo | all ages Shocking Truth | fourth- to sixth-graders Electrical Safety coloring contest | each May


To schedule an electrical safety program, contact your local electric co-op. Visit www.safeelectricity.org for electrical safety videos and other safety resources for parents, teachers and kids.


MAY 2015 MAY 2015 15


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140