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People’s Powerline | January 2017


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Bundle Up for Winter Storms


A


re you ready for winter’s cold grasp? Snow and ice are inevitable when deal-


ing with winter storms, but being prepared can make a world of difference. People’s Electric Cooperative recommends the fol- lowing tips to help you prepare for wintery blasts.


Winterize your home Winter storms wreak havoc on your home. By winterizing your living space, you’ll be prepared for extreme cold and hazardous conditions.


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• Remember to maintain and inspect heating equipment and chimneys every year to ensure they’re working safely and properly.


• Caulk and weather strip doors and windows to make the most of your heating system.


• Freezing temperatures often cause water pipes to burst. Remember to insulate pipes with insulation or newspapers and plastic. Allow faucets to drip during extreme cold to avoid frozen pipes.


• Consider installing storm windows for better insulation. You can also cover windows with plastic (from the inside) to keep the cold out.


• Make sure everyone in your family knows where the home’s fire extinguisher is located and how to use it properly. House fires occur more frequently during winter months, as people tend to use alternative heating methods that may not be safe.


Prepare a winter survival kit Severe winter storms often bring heavy accumulation of ice and snow, which can lead to downed power lines and extended outages. PEC crews will work hard to restore power, but having a winter survival kit on hand is a smart idea. 582600100


• Food: Store food that does not require cooking, such as canned goods, crackers, dehydrated meats and dried fruit. Keep a large supply of water on hand. Ready.gov recommends five gallons per person.


• Medication: Be sure to refill all prescriptions in the event of a major power outage.


• Identification: Keep all forms of identification handy, such as driver’s licenses, photo IDs and social security cards. Bank account information and insurance policies are also good to have on hand.


• Other items: First Aid Kit, blankets, flashlight, battery-powered radio and extra batteries.


Stay warm and safe If an outage occurs, you should plan for an alternate heating source. A fireplace, propane space heater or wood-burning stove would be sufficient. Fuel and wood- burning heating sources should always be vented, and make sure carbon monoxide and smoke detectors are working properly. Always practice extreme caution when using alternate heating sources.


If you decide to use a portable generator during an outage, make sure it is placed outside the home for proper ventilation. Be careful not to overload the generator. Use appropriate extension cords that can handle the electric load, and make sure to read your owner’s manual.


TAKE CHARGE TIP: In the event of a power outage, program PEC’s outage number into your phone: 1-877-272-1500 or (580) 272- 1500, local Ada Area.


Energy Efficiency Tip of the


Month


October Power Up Winner (above, l-r) Chesna Henry of Tupelo accepts a Pow- erUp prize package from PEC’s Member Account Manager Antonine “T.J.” Peek. Chesna was entered to win October’s featured product drawing when she signed-up for SmartHub in October.


October Paperless Winner (above, l-r) PEC’s Director of Human Resources Maranda Babb presents a Kindle Fire to Chelsie Hendley of Ada. Chelsie was entered to win October’s paperless drawing when she signed-up for paperless billing in October.


A crackling fire in the hearth warms the house, but don’t let it heat up your electric bill! Caulk around the fireplace hearth and keep the damper closed when a fire is not burning.


Source: TogetherWeSave.com


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