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Be Prepared for Winter Storms


When winter temperatures drop and storms hit, it can be challenging to stay safe and warm. NFEC cares about your safety, and we want you to be prepared.


Save on Lighting; Save on Energy One of the easiest ways to save money on your utility bill—and do your part


for the environment at the same time—is to be smarter about the lighting in your house.


Here are five ways to save energy with smarter lighting choices: 1. Identify the rooms where your family spends the most time. Replace the light fixtures—overhead, undercounter and tabletop—with LED fixtures. They can last up to 50 times longer than a lamp or overhead fixture that takes an old- fashioned incandescent light bulb. And you don’t ever need to change the bulbs. In 50 years, when the fixture wears out, you’ll replace the whole fixture. 2. Buy lighting products that carry a warranty of at least two years. That goes for LED fixtures, ceiling fans with built-in lights and other products. If you buy Energy Star lighting products, the warranty is required. 3. Install ceiling fans. Choose a combo unit that includes both a the fan and a


light; your electrician can install it in the spot that used to house just the overhead light. Ceiling fans move the air around and make a room feel cooler in the sum- mer and warmer in the winter. 4. Use your dimmers. They’re not just for mood lighting; they’re for energy


savings, too. Most dimmers conserve energy. 5. This one’s not new: Turn the lights off when you leave a room. Train your


family to do the same. Impossible? Install motion-sensing lights or add a timer to your lights so they turn off automatically when nobody’s using the room.


Hidden Account Number


If you see your account number in this newsletter, call our office, identify yourself and the number. We will credit your electric bill $25. The number may be located anywhere in the newsletter and is chosen at random. If you don’t know your account number, call our office or look on your bill. To get the credit, you must call before the next month’s newsletter is mailed.


Heavy snow and ice can lead to downed power lines, leaving co-op members without power. During ex- tremely low temperatures, this can be dangerous. During a power outage, our crews will continue to work as quickly and safely as possible to restore power, but there are a few things you can do to prepare yourself. • Stay warm – Plan to use a safe alternate heating source, such as a fireplace or wood-burning stove during a power outage. These are great options to keep you and your loved ones warm, but exercise caution, and never leave the heating source unattended. If you are using gasoline-, propane- or natural gas-burning devices to stay warm, never use them indoors. Remember fuel- and wood-burning sources of heat should always be properly ventilated. Always read the manufacturer’s direc- tions before using. • Stay fed – The CDC recom- mends having handy several days’ supply of food that does not need to be cooked. Crackers, cereal, canned goods and bread are good options. Five gallons of water per person should also be available in the event of an extended power outage. • Stay safe – When an outage occurs, it usually means power lines are down. It is best not to travel during winter storms, but if you must, bring a survival kit along, and do not travel alone. If you encounter downed lines, always assume they are live. Stay as far away from the downed lines as possible, and report the situation to our dispatchers by calling 580-928-3366 or 1-800-668-6587 if possible. Winter weather can be unpredict-


able and dangerous, and planning ahead can often be the difference between life and death. NFEC is ready for what Mother Nature has in store, and we want you to be ready, too.


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