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Best Made in OK Griffi n’s Syrup


up By Laura Araujo A


fl uffy stack of pancakes is a great way to start the day—even better when they’re dressed with a driz-


zle of Griffi n’s Syrup. For more than 100 years, Griffi n Foods has been a proud Oklahoma-based com- pany. The brand has become a household name, in part due to the popularity of its pancake and waffl e syrups. Brothers John W. and Charles M.


Griffi n founded Griffi n Foods in 1908. Originally from Mississippi, the pair fi rst opened a grocery wholesale company in Durant, Okla. In 1911, Griffi n Foods was incorporated in Muskogee, Okla. A century later, John T. Griffin, the grandson of one of the founders, serves as president of the family-owned company.


“Griffin Foods items have been in


Griffi n’s Syrup. Photo by Laura Araujo


Oklahoma stores for years. That’s why we have such a loyal following,” says Cliff Beahm, Griffi n Foods vice president of sales. “John is proud to be an Oklahoman.


Best Fishing Spot: Lake Tenkiller Y


By Gail Banzet-Ellis


ear-round fi shing is available at Lake Tenkiller where Park Manager Lessley Pulliam says fi shermen and women can reel in a great catch during any season. Spanning more than 12,000 acres in the Oklahoma Ozarks near Tahlequah, the lake is known for its white bass and catfi sh as well as a smallmouth bass fi shery. “People fi sh for winter crappie, spring sandbass and crappie, fall smallmouth and catfi sh anytime of the year,” Pulliam says. Residents from Oklahoma, Arkansas, Texas, Kansas, Missouri and Louisiana regularly visit Lake Tenkiller’s campsites and cabins to experience the great outdoors. “The lake reaches depths of 156 feet near the dam,” Pulliam says. “The clear water, limestone bluffs and Ozark Mountains are a prime draw for fi shermen and women.” Lake Tenkiller caters to visitors with fi shing structures and markers, provided by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation. An annual fi shing clinic is available to the public each May. Pulliam says Tenkiller State Park’s 48 cabins as well as unique, Civilian Conservation


Corps era cabins at the nearby Greenleaf State Park contribute to the lake’s enjoyable fi shing experience. Bed and breakfasts and other marina attractions also are available in the Lake Tenkiller area. For more information, visit www.travelok.com


14


Lake Tenkiller. Photo courtesy of Oklahoma Tourism & Recreation Dept.


He is a fi rm believer in employing local people and supporting the community.” In 1930, Griffi n Foods began manufac- turing and selling its popular pancake and waffl e syrups. The difference between the two products? Beahm says it’s subtle. The waffl e syrup is slightly thicker, darker and richer. The pancake syrup is lighter in col- or and not quite as sweet.


he says.


“It’s a matter of personal preference,” Besides Griffi n Foods’ track record of


quality, a wide variety of fl avored pancake syrups—everything from bacon and butter pecan to praline and pumpkin—helps set it apart. New to the product line is a three-ingredient organic syrup made with organic cane sugar, organic fl avor and water. Today, you don’t have to live in


Oklahoma to enjoy the syrup; it’s avail- able regionally, nationally and some is even exported.


So grab a bottle, cook up a short stack and enjoy this sweet, made-in-Oklahoma topping.


OK Producoduct:


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