This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
held there, as well as regular mee ngs of the An -Horse Thief Associa on. By 1896, enrollment was reported at approximately 45 students.


Old- mers may do well to recall the schools that popped up as the area grew, including Valley View, Monroe, Walnut Hill, Cleora, Old Cleora and New Cleora. All of these had consolidated to a single school a er the destruc on of the Old Cleora school by a tornado in 1928.


The building as it sits today was constructed in 1940 by order of the Work Projects Administra on, or “WPA.” Cleora had a high school un l the late 1950s. A er the 1956-57 school year, older students were absorbed into larger neighboring schools. Ten seniors graduated from Cleora that fi nal year of


the high school.


Indeed, educa on in Cleora has persisted throughout the decades, surviving natural disasters, consolida on, and even reloca on due to the construc on of a lake. *124755*


In 2001, Cleora became a member of the Oklahoma Rural Elementary Schools (ORES) organiza on. ORES was founded in 1984 to protect, promote and preserve more than one-hundred member schools statewide. Over the past ten years, ORES schools have experienced a 24% increase in enrollment. These schools boast low dropout rates and receive twice as many incoming transfers as they send out. ORES students are con nuously top performers in academic compe  ons statewide and graduates are o en top


students at their receiving high schools. Addi onally, ORES athletes go on to be leading performers on high school teams and likewise successfully compete at the post-secondary level.


While it may be necessary to say good- bye to the 75-year-old Cleora school facility, it certainly will not be easy to move on. Sen ments run deep for many of its former students. School board president Billy Jarvis was emo onal as he addressed patrons assembled at the October 28 groundbreaking. He refl ected on what the school meant to his family.


“I went to this school. I started here,” said the 63-year-old Jarvis, who a ended fi rst through eighth grades at Cleora before moving on to A on in 1967. “I couldn’t even begin to tell you how


 January 2017 - 5


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112