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The ElectraLite


January 2017 2015 Capital Credit Allocation Formula


CVEC capital credit assignments are based on the co-op’s revenues in excess of its expenses. These numbers are recorded as capital furnished by the members and are referred to as capital credits. In 2015, this amounted to $2,978,090.69. This amount is not represented as cash, but as the co- op’s equity interest in its distribution system.


Canadian Valley also receives capital credits from its generation and transmission cooperative, Western Farmers Electric Cooperative, from whom we purchase electricity. For 2015, WFEC paid CVEC capital cred- its in the amount of $2,792,769.17. This is your notice regarding the assignment of your 2015 capital cred- its. This method avoids the expense


Classification Residential


Small Commercial & Irrigation Large Power Large Power - 2


of printing and mailing individual notices. You can request specific information about your account by contacting the co-op.


The 2015 capital credits are assigned to consumers as a book figure on the co-op’s records. They are payable to the membership only upon dissolution of the co-op after all


you have.


2. Locate your rate code on a recent electric bill, and match it to one of the classifications below. 4. Take the classification’s decimal factor times the total of your 2015 bills. 5. This amount is your 2015 capital credits. Example: 2015 total billing - $1,000. Rate code - 2 $1,000 x .0673889943 = $67.39 2014 CVEC capital credit $1,000 x .0391924314 = $39.19 2014 WFEC capital credit


Rate Code 2, 4


10-21


22-28, 32, 35, 39 33, 36-38, 40, 42


CVEC Factor 0.0673889934 0.0812830262 0.0182514471 0.0088661717


WFEC Factor 0.0391924314 0.0339335110 0.0577939797 0.0607192876


Shop for Post-Holiday Deals on LED Christmas Lights The best time to plan for an


energy-efficient 2017 Christmas light display is before Valentine’s Day. Online and in stores, retailers are offering rock-bottom prices on holi-


day decorations as they make room on their shelves for the spring garden- ing season. So it’s a great time to look for deeply discounted LED lights to decorate your house and tree later this year.


Look for Canadian Valley Elec- tric Cooperative, Inc. on Face- book for up-to-date information about your Co-op!


LED lights aren’t cheap, so buy- ing them during post-holiday sales makes them more affordable. If you wait until November or December to make the switch, you’ll pay approxi- mately twice as much for LED lights than for more traditional lights. But they’ll pay for themselves over time because they use up to one-


indebtedness is paid. Any remaining balance will be retired on a prorated basis at the time, provided the board of trustees makes a partial retirement prior to such event after determining the financial condition of the co-op won’t be impaired. Capital credits are not cash and cannot be applied as payments on electric bills.


Here is how to determine your capital credit: 1. Add up the amount of your 2015 electric bills, for each CVEC account


third less power than the incandescent lights that still brighten most Christ- mas trees. That means you’ll save some money on your holiday energy bill, especially if your light display is grand.


And you’ll save in the long run because LED lights last up to 10 times longer than traditional lights, and they’re more durable. Plus, LED bulbs, because they don’t have fila- ments, don’t heat up and burn out. That makes them safer on Christmas trees


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