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Additional Co-op Solar Projects


There are other electric cooperatives in Oklahoma that are currently offering solar power opportunities to their member- ship. The following co-ops are not members of Western Farmers Electric Cooperative; they are served by other generation and transmission cooperatives, including Golden Spread Electric Cooperative and Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation, Inc. (AECI).


Tri-County Electric Cooperative (TCEC): Headquartered in Hooker, Okla., TCEC serves Beaver, Cimarron and Texas counties in the Oklahoma Panhandle as well as coun- ties in Kansas, Texas, New Mexico and Colorado. TCEC was the fi rst utility in the state of Oklahoma to offer a community solar project to its membership. A 3,840-panel community solar array sits on 5 acres of the co-op’s property in Hooker, Okla. The project—which generates 1 MW—is possible through a part- nership between TCEC and Today’s Power, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of AECI. “Adding solar to our power mix keeps us relevant,” Chief Executive Offi cer Zac Perkins said. “Our membership wants us to be their energy partner, they look for us to provide solutions, and if we don’t, they will go elsewhere.” The 1 MW of solar power generation helps lessen TCEC’s peak demand needs with their power supplier, Golden Spread Electric Cooperative based in Amarillo, Texas. TCEC’s community solar project went live in March 2016. Currently, 470 panels have been subscribed by TCEC’s members. To learn more, visit www.tcec.coop


Co-op members receive credit on their electric bill based on the energy production from the panels subscribed.


SUBSCRIBERS ELECTRIC CO-OP


The renewable electricity is distributed to the co-op’s consumers via distribution powerlines.


Source: Adapted from the Shelton Group, Inc.


Ozarks Electric Cooperative: Based in Fayetteville, Ark., Ozarks Electric Cooperative serves fi ve counties in Arkansas and the counties of Delaware, Cherokee, Adair and Sequoyah in Oklahoma. As a result of an agreement with Today’s Power, Inc., the cooperative offers a 1 MW utility-scale, member-owned solar project to their members. Located in Springdale, Ark., the utility-scale site has 4,080 panels. The project went live in April 2016 and 369 panels are currently subscribed. “We strongly believe this solar project creates a positive impact, both environmentally and fi nancially, for


our members and our community. This project comes as yet another example of our commitment to our purpose,” Mitchell Johnson, Ozarks Electric’s chief executive offi cer, said. Energy produced by the facility is offered to members through Ozarks Natural Energy, a low-cost alternative solution to rooftop solar installations, via the purchase of shares of the facility’s output. Participating members will receive a monthly credit on their electric bill for the energy produced by each purchased share. To learn more, visit https://www.ozarksecc.com/one


Arkansas Valley Electric Cooperative: Headquartered in Ozark, Ark., Arkansas Valley Electric Cooperative (AVECC) serves 10 counties in Arkansas as well as the counties of LeFlore, Sequoyah and Adair in Oklahoma. In September 2016, AVECC announced the completion of a 500 kW solar array, which sits adjacent to the co-op’s offi ce in Van Buren, Ark. The project includes 1,530 panels and comes via a partnership with Today’s Power, Inc. “By harvesting energy from the sun we will be able to provide cost savings by reducing the demand for


wholesale power, assist in peak shaving and help stabilize capacity in high-use periods,” AVECC Chief Executive Offi cer Al Simpson said. “With a decline in solar prices the last few years and after-tax installed cost, the time was right for this facility.” To learn more, visit: http://www.avecc.com


HOW COMMUNITY SOLAR WORKS COMMUNITY SOLAR FARM


The co-op builds a solar array. Members subscribe to the output of one or more solar panels, including all the environmental benefits.


ENGAGEMENT


COMMUNITY SOLAR


Did You Know?


Installed solar


capacity in the U.S. is at 35.8 gigawatts, enough to


power 6.5 mil- lion U.S. homes.


Source: SEIA JANUARY 2017 9


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