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Cimarron Board Continues Education


NRECA’s Director Cer- tificate Programs are specifically designed to help electric coopera- tive directors, at every stage of their service, understand their roles and responsibilities, stay up-to-date on the key issues and trends in the industry and prepare them to meet the challenges facing electric cooperatives now and in the future.


The Director Certificate Programs are offered in three parts, taken in progression from fun- damental to advanced:


The Credentialed Cooperative Director (CCD) curriculum


Amie Reed shows off her CCD Certificate. Amie is the Director over District 4. Robert Yeoman shows off his Board Leadership Certificate. Robert is the Director over District 7.


consists of five courses designed to provide es- sential knowledge and skills required of coop- erative directors. The CCD is earned by


attending all five (5) required courses and successfully completing a learning assessment for each.


For directors who have already completed the Credentialed Coop- erative Director (CCD) Certificate, the Board Leadership Certifi- cate (BLC) is the next step in advancing the knowledge and expe rience directors need to govern their board ef- fectively. The BLC can be attained after earn- ing the CCD and then completing a total of 10 credits from specialty areas.


The Director Gold credential recognizes directors who have earned their CCD and BLC credentials and are committed to con- tinuing their education throughout their service on the board.


Wood Burning Fireplace Could Cost You Cash


Even if you love the crackle and warmth of a natural-burning wood fire in the hearth, you probably could live without the added cost to your energy bill. Sure, the flickering flames make you feel warm while you’re sitting nearby, but wood-burning fires actually have negative efficiency. They emit little or no warmth to a room. And fireplaces are drafty, so they send warm air up the chimney. Wood-burning fires also can create particles that pollute the air indoors and outdoors and could poison the house with carbon monoxide. That doesn’t mean you have to close your fireplace up forever. Instead, try improving the efficiency and safety of your beloved hearth: * Close the fireplace damper when you’re not burning wood. This will cut down on the loss of warm room air through the chimney.


* Cover the front of the fireplace with tempered glass doors or fireplace covers, which seal the fire place opening and prevent room air from escaping. Supply the fireplace with outside combustion air. You don’t want your warm inside air from being used to feed the fire and lost up the chimney.


* Install a heat exchanger, which will circulate the fire’s warmth throughout the room. * Hire a professional to sweep your chimney and clean and maintain the fireplace. * Perhaps you can replace wood with electric “logs” that you can insert into the fireplace, or plug in


an electric fire place instead of burning wood.


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