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| safety first


Space Heaters Cont'd


Due to safety and air-quality concerns, portable propane and kerosene space heaters are not safe for use in a home or other unventilated area. Even when installed properly, they can emit low levels of carbon monoxide. Instead, look for an electric space heater. The two main types are infrared or convection heaters. Both have advantages and disadvantages so be sure to read the small type so you'll purchase the best type for you.


Remember, if you need a space heater to keep your home comfortable, your home will likely benefit from additional insulation or air sealing. Both are great investments that can significantly reduce your energy bills. You should also consider simple short-term measures, such as weather stripping around drafty doors and windows, hanging thermal curtains or installing window film, and using rugs to cover uncarpeted floors.


Choctaw Electric can help you figure out the best measures to take to keep your home comfortable. Schedule a free energy audit for real answers about your home's efficiency. Your co-op also offers low interest loans to help you pay for a long list of energy efficiency improvements.


To schedule a free energy audit or get more details on CEC's energy efficiency loans, please call 800-780-6486 or visit www.choctawelectric.coop.


Riding the Storm Out Tips for surviving the worst of winter weather


W •


hen an ice or snow storm causes a power outage, preparation is key to staying safe and comfortable. Below are some tips to


keep in mind before, during and after a storm: •


Begin storm preparations as soon as possible. Stock up on flashlight batteries, bottled water, snacks and other foods that don’t require cooking. Keep a battery-operated radio handy for news. If you take prescription medications, make sure you have an ample supply. Remember, even if you're unsure of the storm’s path, prepare for it anyway. At worst, you'll be stocked and ready for the next big weather event.


Leave your phone plugged into the wall, especially if there's a chance of power outages. If the power goes out, you're guaranteed to have maximum battery power. To further preserve battery life, put your phone on Airplane Mode.


• Don't bring grills or generators inside. Both emit carbon monoxide that could poison you in a confined space.





If you're using a backup generator, please let your co- op know. Generators can back-feed electricity onto power lines if they aren't connected properly. It helps CEC linemen stay safe if they know in advance where a generator is being used.


• Avoid opening your refrigerator or freezer. During an outage, opening them less often will help food stay cold longer.


• Don't go near downed power lines or attempt to drive around them. Report the situation to your co-op immediately at 800-780-6486 or call 911.


REPORT OUTAGES FAST!


Use Smarthub to report an outage and you'll never get a frustrating busy signal! Two ways to access Smarthub:


1. Download the app from the App Store or at www. smarthubapp.com. You will be asked to register by providing an email address, password, and CEC account number. Once registered, use Smarthub to report an outage via smartphone, tablet or computer.


2. Visit www.choctawelectric.coop and click Report An Outage at the upper right of the homepage.


CEC Inside Your Co-op | JANUARY 2017 | 7


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