This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
PAGE 2 | APRIL 2015


A day in the life... Continued from page one.


Because they’re working with live lines, Joe puts on his fire retardant long sleeve shirt. He slips on his protective sleeves and rubber gloves. After putting on his harness, he goes up in the bucket to work on the job.


Te day starts out cool but as the sun moves upward the day heats up. It’s windy today and the bucket sways a bit as he works. Joe sweats in his safety gear and remembers to drink plenty of water to replenish fluids.


Although his mind is on the job, he keeps one eye looking over his shoulder at the highway. He faces the known dangers of working with live electricity but the unknown risk of a distracted driver on the highway is always in the back of his mind. Tey’re just as deadly.


At lunchtime, the crew takes a 30 minute break at the job site. Joe eats the sandwich he has brought along and drinks a Gatorade from the crew’s cooler. After lunch, he and his crew continue working until 2:30 p.m. when it’s time to clean up any debris from the job and


Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month


head back to the warehouse. Once there, he unloads and prepares for the following day.. By 3:30 p.m. his day is done.


Joe heads home where he plays with his kids and eats supper with his family before seeing that a storm is moving in. Joe calls it an early night knowing he’s on call if an outage occurs. He gets a quick nap before the wind starts howling and rain pours down.


His phone rings, the power is out. He gets dressed again and kisses his wife and kids goodbye. He heads out to meet his crew and assess the damage. He works through the night with his rain gear on and keeps working the next day to restore power to as many members as possible as quickly and safely as he can.


Joe works until sundown that day and falls into an exhausted sleep. He will work sunup to sundown until power is restored. He’ll talk to members who stop to ask when their power will be back on and he’ll keep loving what he does. He’s grateful tomorrow is new day and he’s keeping the lights on. n


Electrical Safety


Keep cool this summer! ENERGY STAR certified refrigerators are about 9-10 percent more energy efficient than models that meet the federal minimum energy efficiency standard.


Source: U.S. Department of Energy


Tip of the Month Install carbon monoxide alarms on every level of your home and outside each sleeping area.


Source: Electrical Safety Foundation International


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168