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energy wise


Money For Schools


Rural electric cooperative gross receipts tax is distributed to schools based on the miles of electric line located in a school district. Kiwash Electric and Western Farmers Electric Cooperative contributed the following amounts to local schools in 2014.


School


Arapaho/Butler Leedey


Burns Flat Lone Wolf Canute


Mt. View-Gotebo Clinton Sentinel Cordell Snyder


Hammon


Taloga Oakwood Hobart


TFC Unified Weatherford


GR Tax Received $147,252.72 $120,854.22 $34,555.04 $43,280.97 $34,723.17 $87,993.22 $77,576.49 $71,783.94 $106,986.23 $7,430.60 $63,310.20 $63,038.27 $68,090.08 $107,434.45 $85,321.06


TOTAL TAXES PAID $1,114,630.66


to buying a “net zero” home that produces as much energy as it uses.


I


Making just one change each year can do wonders for your energy bills—and help you do your part to make your home more efficient so it uses fewer natural resources. Here are six ideas:


Start small. Replace your old incandescent light bulbs with LED light fixtures, which use 75 percent less energy. A bonus: Most of them last for around 10 years, so you can stop changing light bulbs.


Buy smart. If your refrigerator, heating and air conditioning systems, or washing machine is 10 years old, it’s probably an energy hog. When it’s time to replace a home appliance, choose one with the Energy Star label, which means it meets stringent government standards for energy efficiency.


Save water. Some households waste more water than they use. You can remedy that by turning off faucets while brushing your teeth and shaving, and by taking shorter showers. Plus, if you install low-flow faucets and toilets, you’ll use less water with every shower and flush.


Make One Green Change This Year


f you’re ready to “go green,” you have a lot of choices, from switching to energy-efficient light bulbs


Think ‘green.’ Homeowners have lots of opportunities to choose a sustainable or energy-efficient product over one that’s less beneficial to the environment. Keep that top of mind as you select cleaning products and items that come with a lot of packaging that will wind up in a landfill. And if you’re remodeling, consider using durable products that won’t wind up in the trash after a few years, and materials made from renewable sources and grown in sustainable forests.


Take control. There’s no reason to heat or cool your house for maximum comfort when nobody’s home. Install a programmable thermostat that will automatically adjust the temperature to save energy when everyone leaves the house in the morning and then reset it for comfort just before you get home. New models let you control them using your smartphone, which means if your schedule changes automatically, you can “tell” your house to get ready for your early return.


Rise and shine. One of the quickest ways to lower your home’s energy bills is to generate some power yourself. By adding a modest 3-killowatt solar array to your roof, you can harness enough sunlight to reduce your energy bill by up to half, according to most estimates.


ENERGY EFFICIENCY Tip of the Month


Your home works hard for you. Consider giving it an energy checkup. Hire a professional energy auditor to diagnose where your house could be losing energy and where you can start saving money. Auditors check for air leaks, inspect insulation, survey heating and cooling equipment and more. After making efficiency upgrades, you could save 5 to 30 percent on your energy bills.


Source: EnergySavers.gov


Kilowatt | APRIL 2015 | 3


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