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Co-op Tax Fills Gap In School Funding Gross receipts taxes paid by members provide help for rural schools


coming up in Kiamichi Country


April 5


Easter Egg Hunt Robbers Cave State Park Nature Center


April 7


Wilburton vs. Harlem Ambassadors 7 pm, EOSC Gymnasium


April 11-12


Music on the Mountain Viking & Celtic Festival Heavener Runestone Park, Heavener


April 11


Poteau Rotary Wine & Arts Festival 105 Reynolds Ave., Poteau


April 11


Mountain Gate Poker Run 201 1st Street, Talihina


April 18


Green Frog Festival & Puddle Jump Run Main Street, Wilburton


April 25


Thor's Hammer 10K/5K Run Heaven Runestone Park, Heavener


May 1-2


Dutch Oven Cooking Class Robbers Cave State Park


May 9


Cavanal Killer Walk 407 Hughes Drive, Poteau


May 16 Italian Festival


Southwest Expo Center, McAlester May 23


Ricky Huddleston Steer Wrestling Huddleston Arena, Talihina


May 30


Wilburton Main Street Cruise Night 6-10 pm, Wilburton


percent of these funds. The gross receipts tax paid by Oklahoma's electric co-ops helps fill that financial gap by providing funds to rural schools based on the miles of electric line in a school district.


A


"Ninety-five percent of the gross receipts taxes paid by Kiamichi Electric goes directly to rural secondary schools in our service territory," said Jim Jackson, CEO of Kiamichi Electric. "We don't mind collecting this tax because it provides a direct benefit to schools right here at home."


Oklahoma law requires electric co-ops in Oklahoma to collect gross receipts tax. The tax is equal to two percent of the gross receipts from the sale and distribution of electric power during the calendar year. The tax appears on member's bills as GR tax.


In 2014, Kiamichi Electric and its power supplier, Western Farmers Electric Cooperative, collected and remitted over $1.2 million in gross receipts taxes to the state.


The Oklahoma Tax Commission allocates 95 percent of gross receipts taxes to schools based on the number of miles of co-op-owned electric line located in the district. The remaining five percent is retained by the State Treasurer's office for placement into the general revenue fund.


Forty-two schools in KEC service territory benefit from the electric cooperative tax. (See table, right.)


For more on this tax, please see Oklahoma Statute Section 1803- 1806, Title 68.


6 | march - april 2015 | Light Post


d valorem taxes provide funding for schools in Oklahoma, however, rural schools receive less than 50


School District Stringtown


McCurtain Keota Stuart


Wilburton Red Oak


Buffalo Valley Panola Spiro


Heavener Panola Pocola Leflore


Cameron Canadian Panama Bokoshe Poteau Wister


Talihina


Whitesboro Howe


Shady Point Monroe Hodgen


Fanshawe Hartshorne Canadian Haileyville Kiowa


Quinton Indianola Crowder Savanna Pittsburg McAlester Haywood Krebs


Frink Chambers Tannehill Albion


Tuskahoma Antlers Clayton


TOTAL


School District Gross Receipts Tax Taxes Paid


$42,539.68 2,764.18 3,445.21 8,135.46


94,470.57 28,953.30 27,651.83 18,787.08 65,316.48 35,947.19 28,273.92 1,380.88 36,889.78 15,915.40 8,547.93


26,652.92 16,195.47 24,176.62 12,869.12 16,033.56 31,516.46 15,772.95 3,496.16 15,249.83 19,316.07 9,864.77 60,279.86 46,678.34 81,992.02 92,183.29 20,987.99 84,453.35 80,954.54 37,133.78 35,588.32 4,515.10


10,949.94 4,572.02 11,378.56 18,437.54 15,328.65 24,861.84 11.92


3,474.83 $1,220,098.28


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