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A rose by any other name. . .


• Select a large, plump bulb. It should feel heavy for its size.


• The bulb should feel fi rm, not so or spongy. • Select a bulb with roots s ll a ached.


Garlic Mac Crumb topping: 4 tablespoons (1/2 s ck) unsalted bu er 2 cups Panko bread crumbs 3 tablespoons chopped fresh chives Pasta and sauce: 1 head garlic Olive oil


1 pound uncooked macaroni 8 tablespoons (1 s ck) unsalted bu er 6 tablespoons all-purpose fl our 5 cups whole milk 5 1/2 cups shredded cheddar cheese 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese 1/2 teaspoon ground mustard powder 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon ground black pepper


Crumb topping: Melt the bu er in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the breadcrumbs and chives, s rring to combine. Cook for 1 to 2 minutes un l lightly toasted. Remove from heat and set aside.


Pasta and sauce: Preheat oven to 400ºF. Slice top one-third off head of garlic. Place bo om por on on a piece of foil, drizzle with olive oil. Replace top por on and squeeze foil up and around head to create a sealed packet. Roast garlic for 30 minutes. Remove roasted garlic from oven and squeeze cloves into a bowl. With the back of a spoon, mash cloves into a paste. Set aside.


Cook pasta in a large pot of salted water un l al dente. Drain pasta, reserving 1/2 cup of the cooking water. Bu er a 13x9-inch baking dish.


In a large saucepan, melt bu er over medium-low heat. S r in fl our and garlic paste. Cook roux, s rring constantly, for 3 minutes un l golden. Whisk in the milk. Bring sauce to a boil, whisking constantly, then reduce to a simmer and let it cook for 3 minutes. S r in cheeses, mustard powder, salt and pepper un l well combined. Add pasta and reserved 1/2 cup of water to pot, s rring to combine. Mixture will be thin. Transfer to prepared baking dish. Sprinkle with crumb topping and place in the oven. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes un l it's golden brown and bubbling.


Check the back cover for dessert! April 2015 - 11


does not taste the same


Aff ec onately called the s nking rose, garlic is enjoyed by most people. Most o en associated with Italian food, garlic is one of the most versa le fl avors. To ensure you are ge ng the best fl avor, use these  ps when purchasing fresh garlic:


• Avoid bulbs with any green shoots. The garlic will be bi er.


• Peel the paper a bit and look at the cloves. You want plump, white cloves. Avoid yellow or grayish cloves.


S cky Wings 5 pounds chicken wings Salt and pepper to taste 3 tablespoons hot sauce 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 3 cups fl our 3 crushed garlic cloves 2 tablespoons grated ginger (op onal) 1/2 tsp red pepper fl akes 1/2 cup rice vinegar 1/2 cup packed brown sugar 1 teaspoon soy sauce


With a sharp knife, separate chicken wings at joints; discard  ps. Place chicken in a large bowl. Season with salt and pepper; toss to season evenly. Add vegetable oil and toss to coat.


In a large paper or plas c bag, add fl our. Add chicken to bag and toss to coat. Line two cookie sheets with foil. Spray with a light coat of cooking spray. Place chicken on pans, spacing evenly and not touching. Discard excess fl our. Spray chicken lightly with cooking spray. Bake in a 400 degree oven for 30 minutes. Turn chicken over and return to oven for an addi onal 30 minutes. Chicken should be browned and crisp.


In a saucepan, combine remaining ingredients over medium heat. S r constantly un l sauce comes to a boil. Remove from heat. Place one-half the chicken in a large, clean bowl. Drizzle one-half the sauce over cooked chicken and toss to coat.


Turn chicken onto used baking pan to cool for a few minutes. Repeat with remaining chicken and sauce. Enjoy as soon as they are cool enough to eat with your fi ngers.


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