This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
211 You have questions


H


ave you moved recently and don’t know the name of the local newspaper to subscribe? Unemployed and don’t know how to navigate services to help you back on your feet? Concerned a caregiver is taking advantage of an elderly neighbor? These situa ons and most any other can be addressed with a call to the 2-1-1 Helpline.


During a recent mee ng, I had an opportunity to watch a presenta on on 2-1-1 Helpline. I had never heard of 2-1-1. I was impressed with the mission and the care expressed for others by the presenter, and I couldn’t believe I had never heard of such a great service. In case I’m not the only one, here is some informa on on how 2-1-1 works.


The Community Service Council, a United Way partner agency, introduced 2-1-1 informa on services to Oklahoma in 2005. 2-1-1 is a free resource and it’s easy-to-use. Simply dial 2-1-1 from any cell phone or land line. The service is confi den al and available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.


A call to 2-1-1 begins with a brief needs assessment to ensure the caller receives relevant informa on and referrals. Calls are answered by professionally- trained service specialists. Some are employees of 2-1-1, but many are volunteers. Service specialists are prepared to address and assist callers with a wide range of needs. Referrals to the proper support agencies are provided for basic needs such as food, clothing, housing and u li es. Callers facing a crisis such as suicide, domes c violence, or elder abuse, are connected directly to the needed services.


Some mes a caller just needs to talk. The mee ng presenter shared one of her experiences with a call, during which a woman in her 40s had just been diagnosed with late-stage cancer. Before giving the news to her family, she wanted to say it out loud to another person several  mes un l she felt confi dent


April 2015 - 7


 Heartline has answers Kelly Rush, Communica ons Specialist


enough to tell family and friends. While service specialists are not counselors, they are skilled in recognizing what may be the most immediate need of a caller. Some mes that need is to listen.


You may wonder who uses 2-1-1. Most are seeking informa on and resources to meet the basic housing and food needs of a family, but anyone can benefi t from a call to 2-1-1. Frequently, church leaders, employers, and educators will use 2-1-1 as a resource of informa on to share with others. 2-1-1 has over 2,600 help agencies listed within its database.


During community disasters, 2-1-1 works closely with emergency management offi cials to provide reliable and relevant informa on to residents, as well as guide them toward relief eff orts.


Service specialists are fl uent in English and Spanish, and transla on services are available for other languages.


If you would rather search for resources on-line, visit www.211oklahoma.com. You can access informa on on services available in your area, learn more about using 2-1-1, and fi nd out about volunteer opportuni es. 


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168