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Your dollars at work T


he following is from the International Cooperative Alliance summary of the third cooperative principle, Members’ Economic Participation:


Members contribute equitably to, and democratically control, the capital of their cooperative. At least part of that capital is usually the common property of the cooperative. Members usually receive limited compensation, if any, on capital subscribed as a condition of membership. Members allocate surpluses for any or all of the following purposes: developing their co-operative, possibly by setting up reserves, part of which at least would be indivisible; benefiting members in proportion to their transactions with the cooperative; and supporting other activities approved by the membership.


So what do those words mean? When you pay your monthly electric bill, you provide the funding that allows the cooperative to continue providing service (contribute equitably to the capital of the cooperative).


As a member, you have a say (democratically control) through your elected board of trustees. The board sets a strategic direction for the cooperative, then management and employees put that direction into action through the operation of the co-op.


At the end of the fiscal year, if Northeast Oklahoma Electric has received more money than it needed for expenses, a portion is set aside for reserves (members allocate surpluses for any or all of the following purposes: … by setting up reserves) which is like a savings account for the co-op. So if a storm or flood comes through, the co-op will have


Members’ Economic Participation is the third of our seven cooperative principles


By Adam Schwartz, founder of The Coopera ve Way


the funds to do the needed repairs. The remaining amount is allocated to each member based on how much electricity they used during the year (benefiting members in proportion to their transactions). When the co-op is able to retire capital credits, you will receive a check. (See page 8 for a partial listing of returned capital credit checks. A full listing is available at www.neelectric.com.)


While delivering safe, reliable and affordable electricity is most important, Northeast Oklahoma Electric does many other things, too, such as the Operation Round- up program, provide college scholarships, and support local 4-H and FFA chapters (and supporting other activities approved by the membership).


Northeast Oklahoma Electric is not some large power company headquartered in a far off state with stockholders from around the world. We are right here in northeast Oklahoma. We were formed by neighbors and friends who came together with the goal to improve the quality of our lives through electricity. Our goal is to continue to do that by improving the quality of your life with the same neighborly approach.


The cooperative principles guide us, and through your economic participation we make sure our focus is on you, the member-owner. 


Northeast Connection is published monthly to communicate with the members of Northeast Oklahoma Electric Cooperative.


Offi cers and Trustees


PRESIDENT - Dandy A. Risman, District 5 VICE PRESIDENT - John L. Myers, District 4


SECRETARY-TREASURER - Benny L. Seabourn, District 2


ASST. SECRETARY-TREASURER - Everett L. Johnston, District 3 Harold W. Robertson, District 1 Sharron Gay, District 6


James A. Wade, District 7 Bill R. Kimbrell, District 8 Jimmy Caudill, District 9


Management Team Anthony Due, General Manager


Larry Cisneros, P.E., Manager of Engineering Services Susanne Frost, Manager of Offi ce Services Cindy Hefner, Manager of Public Relations Tim Mixson, Manager of Operations


Connie Porter, Manager of Financial Services


Vinita headquarters: Four and a half miles east of Vinita on Highway 60/69 at 27039 South 4440 Road. Grove offi ce: 212 South Main.


Business hours: Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Offi ces are closed Saturday, Sunday and holidays. Available 24 hours at: 1-800-256-6405


If you experience an outage: 1. Check your switch or circuit breaker in the house and on the meter pole to be sure the trouble is not on your side of the service.


2. When contacting the cooperative to report an outage, use the name as it appears on your bill, and have both your pole number and account


number ready.


Please direct all editorial inquiries to Communications Specialist Clint Branham at 800-256-6405 ext. 9340 or email clint.branham@neelectric.com.


This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.


If you wish to fi le a Civil Rights program complaint of dis- crimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, found on-line at http://www.ascr.usda. gov/complaint_fi ling_cust.html, or at any USDA offi ce, or call (866) 632-9992 to request the form. You may also write a letter containing all of the information request- ed in the form. Send your completed complaint form or letter to us by mail at U.S. Department of Agriculture, Director, Offi ce of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Av- enue, S. W., Washington, D.C. 20250-9410, by fax (202) 690-7442 or email at program.intake@usda.gov.


April 2015 - 3


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