This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
energy wise


Efficiency Upgrades That Make Sense A few small changes can make a difference in your energy use


of the home can be improved easily, without breaking your budget.


M Lighting


The price of LED lamps for residential consumers is going down. Sixty watt LED lamps can be purchased at stores such as Walmart for $10 or less. LEDs can save 60 percent or more compared to incandescent bulbs – and LEDs last for several years. Electric co-op members can use their Co-op Connections card to purchase LED bulbs from LEDusa.com at a discount. The website offers hundreds of styles, shapes and types of light ranging from natural light to romantic.


Heating and air conditioning


The Energy Information Agency estimates that heating and air conditioning account for 22 percent of a typical home’s annual electric bill. Options such as an air source heat pump or a ground source heat pump can save homeowners from 20 to 45 percent but the upfront cost is often a barrier to adoption. Take advantage of your co-op's geothermal options to eliminate the bulk of installation costs. KEC's cash back rebate will reduce costs even more, by $750 per ton.


Simple solutions such as changing air filters every three months will increase airflow to rooms, increase the life of your HVAC unit’s motor, and improve the air quality of your home. Seal and insulate ductwork and see energy savings of up to 20 percent.


Finding and sealing air leaks around your home will make your HVAC unit run fore efficienty. To locate leaks, walk through your home on a cold day and feel for drafts around exterior doors and


aking your home more energy efficient doesn't have to cost a fortune. Several areas


windows, electric outlets and entrance points for TV and telephone cables. In basements, target dryer vents, gas lines or any place with an opening in the wall. To fix leaks, apply caulk, spray foam or weather stripping to these areas.


Simple acts, such as cooking outdoors on a hot summer day and keeping curtains closed to keep out summer sun, will keep the interior of the home cooler and reduce the amount of time your AC unit needs to operate.


Appliances and electronics


The appliances and gadgets that make life easier are also the heaviest users of electricity in our homes. When buying a new appliance, look for the ENERGY STAR label. This alone can result in energy savings of 10 to 15 percent for that appliance.


Remember that home electronics such as computers, TVs, DVD players and other modern devices consume power even when turned off. Sometimes these devices are referred to as “energy vampires.” According to a study conducted by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the average home loses 8 percent of its monthly energy consumption to these energy-sucking devices. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, a full 75 percent of the power used to run home electronics is consumed when those appliances are turned off. Cut off power to energy vampires by using a power strip or a smart strip, and stop this senseless loss of energy.


The best energy efficiency improvements are often the easiest. Turning lights off when leaving a room, sealing windows and doors and cleaning refrigerator coils isn’t as much fun as buying a shiny new appliance, but they are proven ways to save energy and increase comfort.


FIND IT ONLINE: Touchstone Energy Cooperatives website Togetherwesave.com offers a wealth of energysavng resources including energy saving blogs, videos, tips and an interactive Energy Saving Home Tour. Visit the site and find the best and most affordable ways to lower your energy costs.


Light Post | march - april 2015 | 5


Did you know the refrigerator is one of the biggest energy hogs in your home? Use these simple tips on how to keep your fridge running efficiently..


• REMEMBER TO COOL DOWN. Warm food in the fridge forces the appliance to adjust the temperature, using more energy.


• A FULL FRIDGE IS A HAPPY FRIDGE. When your refrigerator and freezer are full, the appliance runs more efficiently.


• KEEP IT CLEAN. Remember to clean dust and dirt from the coils behind or underneath the refrigerator.


• TAKE COVER. Uncovered food and liquids release moisture and force the compressor to work harder.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168