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Looking Out For You and Your Confidential Information


While electrical safety remains a main priority for us at Ozarks Electric Cooperative, we don’t stop there. As we continue to become more and more reliant on technology, there are new risks to which we become exposed. This includes everything from scams to identity theft and cybersecurity attacks.


We want our members to be aware that these threats are very real and should be taken seriously. At any given time, members may receive unsolicited communication from individuals claiming to be representatives of Ozarks Electric.


If an individual telephones a member threatening imminent disconnection of service unless payment is made immediately – usually in cash at a third-party location – the call is a scam. We will never call a member to suspend service or to request payment. If a member does receive a call or communication of this nature, please alert local authorities and contact us.


Members may also receive communication from individuals who are soliciting a service. These calls should also be treated as scams. Please alert us immediately if you ever receive communication of this nature. We will never “cold call” a member to solicit a service; we will only call a member regarding a specific service if explicitly requested.


In addition to scams, we also want members to understand that identity theft and cybersecurity risks continue to grow in number and sophistication. Members can rest assured, however, that we maintain the best security and member verification protocols to protect confidential information.


To learn more about our confidential information safety program and protocols, visit www.ozarksecc.com/safety.


Let us worry about the


due dates. Our bank draft option removes the hassle of deadlines and misplaced bills. Visit


www.ozarksecc.com/Payment for more.


“Storm Mode” Keeps Us Prepared for Spring Storms


Spring is upon us, and along with the warm temperatures come spring storms and lightning that can threaten electrical grid reliability. In addition to regular equipment and right-of- way maintenance, technology improvements have played a major role in improving system reliability.


“Smart grid” is our modernized electrical grid, capable of communicating information in an automated fashion. Another part of a smart grid solution is the ability to control devices remotely, shortening or eliminating service interruptions.


In an effort to better serve our membership, we have been utilizing smart grid technology for more than a decade.


One specific smart grid feature we have implemented is a self-healing solution, known as “storm mode”. When storms threaten our area, dispatchers activate this system, which is different than normal operating parameters and is designed specifically to help keep lighting strikes from causing extended outages.


In normal operating mode, smart grid equipment is programed to immediately shut down if a sustained problem is detected. This protects expensive equipment and helps prevent public safety concerns.


During storms lightning energy is dissipated into the electrical grid, resembling an overcurrent or fault situation, which would typically cause electrical grid equipment to automatically disconnect.


When storm mode is active, however, the line is briefly disconnected, minimizing equipment damage. It then restores power to the grid in a fraction of a second.


Over the last two years we have been improving and expanding this technology resulting in a drastic decrease in prolonged outages due to lightning events. Storm mode is just one of the ways we are diligently working to reduce outage time and increase reliability.


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