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ON THE ROAD


Eurotunnel still stays cool


Eurotunnel has released offi cial data demonstrating energy savings of 33% after the fi rst season of operating a new cooling system for maintaining requisite temperatures in the landmark Channel Tunnel.


A


t almost 25 years old, and over 30 miles long, the Channel Tunnel remains the world’s longest undersea tunnel. A feat of engineering in its construction, it serves as a primary connection between the UK and continental Europe for foot passengers, road vehicles and freight.


Channel Tunnel owner Getlink – formerly the Eurotunnel Group – has been proactive in terms of driving environmental initiatives, reporting its carbon footprint every year since 2006 and currently achieving a 47% reduction since then. When the time came to replace the cooling system for the tunnel, the company took the opportunity to see if there could be improvements made to contribute to its environmental eff orts. Getlink’s goal is to maintain the Channel Tunnel’s status as a state-of-the-art infrastructre, guarantee an optimal temperature of around 25°C while anticipating a traffi c increase of up to 42%. Two Trane chillers began operation in Sangatte, France in 2016, with those at Shakespeare Cliff , England commencing operation in October 2017.


22 July 2018


Having monitored the system carefully since 2016, Getlink published its fi ndings – that the system delivers energy savings of at least 33% per year. This translates to 4.8 GWh and approximately €500,000 in 2017, and is the equivalent of saving enough electricity to run 1,000 households.


The newly-released data from the operation of the new cooling system will dramatically boost Eurotunnel’s sustainability eff orts, which to date have been recognised with its fi fth consecutive certifi cation from the UK’s Carbon Trust Standard for a further 9% decrease of its carbon footprint in 2015-2016 compared to 2012-2013. “Eurotunnel’s commitment to environmental protection involves a number of initiatives. We saw the replacement of the Channel Tunnel cooling system as a chance to reduce our energy consumption and carbon footprint,” said François Gauthey, deputy chief executive offi cer of Getlink, the Channel Tunnel owner. “This eff ort required installing a new cooling system – Europe’s largest – to maintain the Channel Tunnel at


optimal ambient temperatures. Honeywell’s Solstice zd refrigerant, with its ultra-low global warming potential, and Trane’s chillers, which are already being used to cool large buildings and infrastructure, provided the best combination of features to help us meet our energy and environmental goals.”


The Channel Tunnel connects Folkestone, Kent, in the United Kingdom with Coquelles, Pas-de- Calais, in northern France. Without round-the- clock cooling, the heat generated by almost 400 high-speed trains per day passing through the tunnel under the English Channel would drive indoor temperatures above 35°C, which is the maximum that can be reached while still running services in optimal condition. The new system ensures that ambient temperatures stay at or around 25°C.


The system contains four Series E CenTraVac large capacity (2600kW to 14,000kW) chillers from Trane, a brand of Ingersoll Rand. “The Series E is part of our EcoWise portfolio of products designed to lower environmental


www.acr-news.com


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