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DEMO VERSION


Isotonic and isometric


Isotonic exercise is roughly defined as ‘exercise with movement’.


Watch video 0.30


Both types of training are valid and will yield a positive, specific and different training effect. What is important is being able to know when to use them appropriately. For example, core stabiliser muscles naturally work ‘isometrically’ to support the spine, so, using the rule of specificity, it makes sense


to train them in this specific (functional) way. Alternatively, the leg muscles naturally work ‘with movement’ when running, jumping and climbing stairs; therefore, it makes sense to train these muscles using isotonic exercises, which replicate the actions they need to perform.


Isometric work can be useful to include in sport-related exercise programmes when it is specific to a particular activity, for example: a rugby forward pushing in a scrum, a wrestler using a hold down or a gymnast holding an iron-cross position on the isometric rings.


Isotonic and isometric video transcript PDF Download


©YMCA Awards 2015


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