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DEMO VERSION


Anaerobic training


Anaerobic adaptations occur when training intensity is at or above OBLA. For people who are moderately or very fit, this generally equates to a heart rate of 80–100% of MaxHR. For people who are less fit, anaerobic training will occur at a significantly lower MaxHR.


Working at this level of intensity is very demanding and can only be done in short bursts lasting a few seconds. Interval training is often used for this purpose.


The adaptations to anaerobic training are specific to the energy systems and muscle fibres employed, and they include:


When structuring anaerobic training sessions into a weekly training schedule, sufficient time must be allowed for the muscles to recover. Working at these higher intensity levels increases delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and a minimum of 48 hours should pass before those specific muscles are targeted again. Immediately after these more intense sessions, the client should be instructed to cool down effectively and thoroughly stretch all the major muscles used in the workout.


©YMCA Awards 2015


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