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about climate change and the way in which such cocern manifests itself locally in congestion, pollution and inefficient use of energy and other resources. Which brings us neatly to connectivity - as urban areas grow, physical communication can quickly degrade if not carefully planned. Against this is our growing ability to communicate without the need for proximity- through digital and social media and the like. And security has emerged as an important theme across the globe as the vulnerability of densely populated areas to hostile action has been demonstrated time and again. Smart city thinking is now exercising the minds


of all sectors; the public sector in seeking to deliver best value to its client populations and the private sector because there is a clearly recognisable international market for its services. Te UK Government has recognised this opportunity by funding the Future Cities Catapult to become a global centre of excellence on urban innovation.


Smart Cities is a significant growth sector


for the consultancy market. Te Future Cities Catapult estimates that the global market for integrated urban solutions will reach £200 billion by 2031. It observes that five business capabilities are leading solutions development: spatial design, physical infrastructure, digital technology, commercial business services, and social service provision. And in our current smart city thinking we need to be mindful of the many unknowns, and that new knowledge will fashion the thinking of future generations- the smart cities market of the future. In this, the inaugural issue of EXPERT VIEW,


British Expertise members showcase diverse and practical examples of how smart thinking can be applied to the planning, design, management and governance of large urban agglomerations.


EV For further information go to www.britishexpertise.org


expertviewmagazine.com


EXPERTVIEW SPRING 2015 9


IMAGE: WWW.SHUTTERSTOCK.COM


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