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enhance performance and wellbeing, to reduce costs and resource consumption, and to engage more effectively and actively with its citizens” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smart_city Consider the technologies we rely on today


such as the internet, smart phones, Bluetooth and many more. 25 years ago the internet did not exist and the smart phone and Bluetooth only came into mass use in the late 1990s. Defunct technologies are numerous and legendary; consider the laser disc, the increasingly irrelevant fax machine, the pager and many more. Countless technologies that we use on a


daily basis will consequently go out of fashion and will be replaced with alternatives. As well as keeping up with the technological times, planners, designers and developers need more durable and universal fundamentals in order to build cities with longevity and future relevance, or as some term, ‘future proof’. Te point of this analogy with the defunct


technologies of the recent past is to highlight that a reliance upon technology alone to create Smart Cities is a fast track to obscurity. Whatever technological innovations that are utilised today in Smart Cities are likely to be usurped by other trends


expertviewmagazine.com


‘A DEFINITION OF WHAT A ‘SMART CITY’ IS RANGE FROM THE PURELY TECHNOLOGICAL TO THE ALL-ENCOMPASSING ‘FUTURE PROOFING’ OF A CITY.’


and inventions within a very short time indeed. Te key therefore to the creation of a durable Smart City must lie in additional elements that transcend the need to keep up a sprinting pace with the current technological advances of the world.


KEY MESSAGE: Smart Cities, those we would want our children to live in, must include the core ingredients of technology, sustainability, planning and liveability in equal measure.


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