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THE SECTOR VIEW: SCHNEIDER ELECTRIC


MANY EXISTING TRANSPORT SYSTEMS ARE ALREADY INADEQUATE FOR THE POPULATIONS THEY ARE EXPECTED TO SUPPORT. SO FAR THE TRADITIONAL CAPACITY BUILDING APPROACH TO MATCH INCREASING DEMAND IS NEITHER EFFICIENT NOR SUSTAINABLE


RAIL IN THE SMART CITY ERA


T


he world’s urban population is expected to surpass six billion by 2045. Tis pace of change is placing intense pressures on the resources and infrastructure that


support our cities. Urban mobility in particular is presenting one of the toughest challenges for cities around the globe. Many existing transport systems are already inadequate for the populations they are expected to support. So far, the traditional capacity building approach to match increasing demand is neither efficient nor sustainable. In the UK, the Office of Rail Regulation (ORR)


reported a five per cent increase in the number of people entering and exiting railway stations between 2013 -2014, equating to 2.65 billion tickets. Combine this with the 5.8 per cent rise (equating to 22.7bn net tonne km) in goods moved on the railways and the pressure on the rail infrastructure is clear. And this trend is unlikely to abate. Network Rail predicts that there will be 400 million more passenger journeys by 2020. It is this unprecedented growth that is


driving forward the era of smart cities. An era where the city becomes efficient and liveable, as well as economically, socially and environmentally sustainable. For the railway industry, this means embracing smart mobility to improve passenger experience and cope with increased demand, whilst reducing operational costs and improving energy efficiency.


SMART DATA. IMPROVED EXPERIENCE Mobility should be seen as an investment in the future growth of cities, rather than an expense. Better use of the data available will allow cities to identify areas of under-utilised capacity to redistribute demand across modes, routes and time to squeeze more out of the current infrastructure whilst consuming much less. For example, real-time journey planning apps


provide users with the capability to see and select travel options based on personal preference, cost, convenience and, using predictive modelling, how


20 EXPERTVIEW SPRING 2015 expertviewmagazine.com


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