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more generations, than may have previously been the case. Te concept of designing a building that will need minimal adaptation to meet the needs of its users as they grow old is a familiar one to most building engineers who have been used to designing buildings with the needs of the less able considered for a number of decades. An increasing reliance on technology can be seen


as a possible solution to many of the problems posed by this aging population; however this in itself generates a need for additional energy, as well as an increasing need to provide the end user of the building with sufficient information to ensure that they understand how to operate the building at its maximum efficiency as well as establishing a need for an ongoing programme of maintenance. Tis need for detailed information sharing


is not restricted to the end user. Building engineers are already using the principles of Building Information Modelling (BIM) to develop and share information throughout the design and construction process, reducing wastage


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and redesign and improving communication, achieving savings in terms of time and cost. In most countries there are already a wide range


of technical standards to be achieved during the design and construction process and levels of performance set for the competed structures. Building engineers have been at the heart of not only producing buildings which meet these standards, but in carrying out the research and advising governments of the ways in which targets can be raised and new standards developed Te Building Engineer, in designing future cities,


will not only need to consider the needs of the client but also the skills and materials available to build the building, the ongoing maintenance and repair, and the needs of the future building users in 25-30 years’ time. All of this will need to be carried out in anticipation of how our needs and demands on the built environment may change over the next 50 years.


EV For more information: www.futurecities.catapult.org.uk EXPERTVIEW SPRING 2015 11


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