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ARCHITECTURE


Figure 5: Plans for The German Hospital.


Figure 7: The Italian Hospital.


Figure 6: The German Hospital.


The Israeli hospital The mutual entity, Chevra Kedusha – a Jewish burial society – founded the Workers Society for Mutual Aid Bikur Joilin in 1898. Rabbi Henry Joseph created the Israeli Mutual Aid and Beneficiary Association, later known as EZRAH – meaning ‘help’ in Hebrew – which was the origin of the Israeli Hospital. Having its seat on a estate on Gaona Street with its first pavilion built in 1916 the Centenario Hospital was built in several stages.


The Syrian-Lebanese Hospital The Syrian-Lebanese Hospital was conceived by Elías María Gorayeb, religious authority of the Maronite Lebanese Congregation and the local Ladies of Charity, on a spot of land on America Avenue. In 1950 the available capacity was 80 beds increasing later to 140 beds. The project belonged to Architect Gabriel Yomha and Engineer José Nehim. In conclusion it must be noted that there certain significant features that relate to all of


these community hospitals. Origin: They all began as strong solitary


entities to assist members of their own community with various services such as education, sanitary assistance (burial, health


and retirement home), religion and finance. Location: They were situated on different


Figure 8: The Spanish Hospital plans (1872).


pieces of land received from donations and monetary contributions from immigrants. They grew into healthcare centres with exclusive services rendered to their members, services which later reached all Argentine citizens


indistinctly. Design: The building projects


were conceived by a working team that included architects, engineers and landscape professionals selected among the community. Those appointed, trained in Europe, project managed and built pavilions for men and women, with delicate designs to differentiate hospitalisation, surgery and treatment areas. Unique designs are seen in cases


of treatment of patients with tuberculosis, a frequent disease of that time, implementing large windows and balconies, suitable orientation to allow the entrance of natural light, features which were deemed fundamental at the time. Operating theatres were also built, with an amphitheatre shape, suitable for surgery teaching, and hospitalisation rooms differentiated


‘They all began as strong solitary entities to assist members of their own community with various services.’


IFHE DIGEST 2015


Figure 9: The Spanish Hospital.


according to social classes (exclusive and/or collective use) with provision of common assistance services. Gardens surrounding the buildings were


designed with local and exotic plants, including commemorative statues to pay tribute to European ancestors who took part


in world wars. Healthcare growth and purpose: Apart


from hospitals, retirement homes for old people and healthcare providing annexes were built on other estates of the City of Buenos Aires and different places of the Province of Buenos Aires. To protect members of a community and provide a


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