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INFECTION CONTROL


based approach to microbiological monitoring. Referencing ‘BS7592:2008: Sampling for Legionella organisms in water systems’, it provides advice on when and where Legionella sampling should be undertaken. It makes additional recommendations for interpreting sample results in healthcare premises, warning that results up to 100 colony-forming units per litre (CFU/l), or negative results, should not be ignored due to the susceptibility of patients.


Easier to follow While the updated Legionella guidance does not require significant changes for the duty holders of healthcare buildings, there are a number of useful additions that may well improve how future Legionella risk is managed and controlled. Overall, the revisions to L8 and technical


Legionella pneumophilabacteria.


adopted secondary control measures – such as chlorine dioxide or copper and silver ionisation – on their domestic water systems, the regimes described in paragraphs 2.80 to 2.118 should be acknowledged and implemented where necessary, especially if temperature control and flushing is not proving to be successful. Chlorine has made a reappearance in the guidance, alongside chlorine dioxide and


copper and silver ionisation, all of which are widely accepted as excellent biocidal measures, and the guidance provides practical advice on their use as well as recommended monitoring programmes. However, it is important to note that these secondary control methods can only be implemented alongside temperature, which should still remain the primary control method. The new guidance recommends a risk-


guidance documents HSG 274 Parts 1-3 provide more practical and dedicated advice for healthcare facilities managers on the management and control of Legionella. These should be welcomed by duty holders and responsible persons, as they are now much easier to understand and ensure compliance with.


Any uncertainty in these areas should be


raised with an expert who can provide advice and best practice examples to help duty holders minimise the risk of Legionella in healthcare environments.





Providing insights into the vast field of healthcare engineering and facility management


62 IFHE DIGEST 2015


CDC/Janice Haney Carr


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