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FACILITY DESIGN


Dynamic modelling of patient, visitor and staff flows during a typical day in a major orthopaedic hospital (above); Analysis of the reception area showing conflict points (right); Analysis of lift usage determined through dynamic modelling to inform lift provision (below).


Peak hour bed-lift usage


25 20 15 10 5 0


10.00 11.00 12.00 13.00 Time Total Ground 1st floor 2nd floor 3rd floor


A&E department – Queen’s Hospital, Romford To capture and resolve key bottlenecks in this existing A&E Department in the UK we modelled current operations and activity levels. This model was then extended to investigate ‘what-if’ scenarios including increased patient numbers and alternative operational strategies. The ultimate goal was to help the hospital management improve patient waiting times, staff experience and processing efficiency. During an initial briefing, the department


staff reported that they were failing the NHS four hour target for A&E, while also experiencing over-crowding in the main waiting room and often had insufficient capacity in the major beds area contributing to a poor patient and staff experience. In addition, the department was expecting a


IFHE DIGEST 2015 14.00 15.00 16.00 17.00


significant increase in patient demand due to the imminent closure of neighbouring A&E facilities. To address these issues, the Trust was considering options for refurbishment, rebuild and alternative combinations of staff resourcing. One option was the possibility of changing from the traditional Triage base system to the newer RAT (Rapid Assessment and Treatment) system. To help inform which of the options and


strategies would be most appropriate our team modelled the current performance of the department using our in-house simulation tool. This model was then used to test various scenarios to explore and compare their impact with respect to key performance indicators such as density in the main waiting area, bed occupancy and patient waiting times. To enable us to build a realistic model of the department, the team gathered data from


‘Powerful simulation techniques are increasingly being used in the design of airports, transport hubs, sport stadia, and schools but rarely for the healthcare sector.’


31


Number of beds


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