This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FIRE SAFETY


Alistair Morrison – Associate at Arup Rob Fleury – Fire Engineer at Arup


Risk-based fire safety for retrofit projects


In this article the authors discuss issues surrounding fire risk in existing healthcare buildings and highlight a recent project example of the risk ranking process that is applied to a portfolio of nursing homes in Australia.


How well do we really understand fire risks in existing healthcare buildings and what can be achieved with that information? Most experienced facility managers have a


good understanding of the fire safety issues for their portfolio of properties, and no doubt a large percentage of these issues would concern day to day operations such as unwanted alarms, staff training and maintenance. This knowledge is built up through daily operations and input from colleagues and sub-contractors. In addition, a process of ongoing fire risk


assessment may be undertaken, which, as a result of the process, can provide a significant body of information and issues to be reviewed, documented and addressed, either through management changes, maintenance or capital expenditure across a building or portfolio. In the UK, this process is a statutory


requirement, supported by documents such as the UK Health Technical Memorandum (HTM) 05-03 which provides detailed guidance for a process of hazard identification and assessment and mitigation using hierarchy of control and the ALARP (As Low as Reasonably Practicable) process. Furthermore, a simplified matrix for evaluating the level of risk on a Negligible to


‘The methodology described in the NFPA documents was adapted to be specific for aged care facilities in Australia.’


IFHE DIGEST 2015 Consequently, there are an ever increasing


1 2 3 4 5


Risk rating


2 4 6 8


10


3 6 9


12 15


4 8


12 16 20


5


10 15 20 25


Beware of low likelihood but high severity Action


1–3 Record findings and review in 12 months.


4–6 Moderate risk – Implement additional controls within 12 months.


8–12 High risk – Implement interim measures immediately and full controls within 3 months.


15–25 Extreme risk – Cease use of area until additional controls have been applied.


Figure 1: Extract from HTM 05-03 Part K.


Extreme rating (Fig.1) is used to broadly assess the overall risk and help prioritise. Where there is a large number of ageing assets or issues for a single building, this tool may not help to provide the clarity needed to prioritise improvements or evaluate the cost benefit.


Alistair Morrison Alistair Morrison is an associate at Arup with a BSc in Fire Science from The University of Leeds. He has over 12 years’ experience as a performance-based fire engineer, both in the UK and Australia, developing integrated fire strategies and fire risk assessments for a range of complex healthcare projects.


He has extensive experience in new and existing healthcare projects – from Trust advisory services for new PFI projects, to risk assessment services to determine the most cost-effective upgrade strategies. Most recently he was the lead fire engineer for the new Royal North Shore Hospital project, Sydney, Australia.


number of fire safety risks to manage and address and the challenge can be where to start or how to know which of these issues demands your earliest attention. In countries such as Australia, the


individual States each develop their own approach, from maintaining existing systems, to detailed audit and fire risk assessment processes used in Victoria with their Capital Development Program or in New South Wales (NSW) with their Health Guidelines PD2012_024, which use an audit process. Both of these examples use the current


codes as a basis for the audit. NSW adopts a more rigid approach to non compliances which must be assessed by a fire engineer (if it cannot be made to comply). Whereas Victoria allows a process of risk assessment against the guidelines in certain circumstances with the combined experience of an accredited fire engineer and building inspector providing a robust and detailed assessment of fire risks.


Risk assessment The advantages of the risk assessment process are that it provides for a more flexible assessment of risk, enabling the individual circumstances to be considered and appropriate solutions developed. A more absolute comparison against current codes for older buildings can result in substantial works or a fire engineered solution which may never achieve a suitable outcome when


Rob Fleury


Rob Fleury is a fire engineer with a draws Masters degree in fire engineering, coupled with experience in fire engineering consulting. His role involves developing integrated fire safety strategies and fire risk assessments for a range of projects including commercial, public entertainment, healthcare, education and residential.


He has a keen interest in performance based smoke control systems, particularly for atria, occupant evacuation, risk engineering and developing sustainable solutions that compliment the general building design.


39


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96