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FIRE SAFETY


Current assessment


Containment Extinguishment safety


safety People General movement safety 1 Evacuation routes unfamilar to staff and unrealistic expectations for evacuation method 2 Maintain policy of thermograhic testing of electric boards in line with AS3000 3 Formalised smoking policy (contained in OHS policy)


4 Maintaining good training records is important to monitor staff and schedule re-training


5 Fire system testing often misses important interaction with other systems in the building


6 Possibility of obstructing external egress paths from doors to assembly area 7 Flammability of soft furnishing 8 Compartmentation -21 -33 -12 59


9 Some penetrations through fire and smoke walls have not been adequately sealed in accordance with the BCA


10 Emergency Management procedures with clear roles and responsibilities and perferred evacuation methods are not provided across the portfolio 11 Evacuation packs to be kept in readily accessible area (secure)


12 Complicate or narrow egress paths 13 Detection and Alarm 14 Fire fighting hydrant coverage


15 Not accounted for risk in spreadsheet 16 Smoke spread


17 Sprinkler protection Effect al all implemented Figure 5: Relative benefit for improvement measures.


corresponding score, which was weighted depending on its relative importance to fire safety, and benchmarked against current code requirements. Consequently, a base line score for a compliant building of similar design was produced such that the existing buildings could be compared to compliant levels and to each other. The scores for the fire safety measures


contributed to one or more of the following Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for compliance: containment safety, extinguishment safety and people movement safety. Furthermore, a General Safety KPI gave an overall consideration of the fire risks present and the fire safety measures including aspects of the design outside the Building Code such as management and design that can help offset that risk (Fig. 3). This general safety score enabled all


facilities to be ranked in order of overall fire risk level, providing the operator with a clear picture of which facilities were most deficient and in what specific areas they were lacking in fire safety (Fig. 4).


This ranking can highlight trends and abnormalities as well as demonstrating the overall benefit of a program of upgrades. Costing information can be over-laid to provide a cost benefit component supporting funding decisions based on the most critical areas or where the biggest improvement will be realised for the smallest outlay.


Key feature of the tool Another key feature of the tool is the ability to measure the positive impact of improving the level of fire safety in a particular facility. (Fig. 5) For example, if sprinklers are installed in Facility ‘X’ the general safety score doubles, or if the level of emergency evacuation training to staff is improved there is a 10% increase in the score. The operator can use these outputs to


filter out the main fire safety issues, highlight the most vulnerable facilities and direct funds to the most critical areas. Additionally, the costs of the improvement can be compared to the benefit, helping to promote those properties that may not have the lowest level


of safety but could receive a significant benefit for relatively little expenditure to achieve an acceptable level of safety. In summary, there is probably no single


method of fire risk assessment that will provide all necessary outcomes to achieve compliance and enable cost-effective decision making. However a fire risk ranking process, used as part of a risk management framework, can provide a valuable systematic process, based on fire safety engineering principles and statistics, to help manage and mitigate the fire risks in healthcare facilities. Such a method can provide facility owners


and operators with a valuable tool to help provide greater clarity to enable decision making based on clear priorities and cost- effectiveness as well as a way of demonstrating managed improvement over time.


Reference 1 National Fire Protection Association, NFPA 101: Life Safety Code and NFPA 101A: Guide on Alternative Approaches to Life Safety.


Recommendations


Containment safety -21


(+0) -21


(+0) -21


(+0) -21


(+0) -21


(+0) -21


(+0) -21


(+0) -8


(+13) -13


(+8) -21


(+0) -21


(+0) -21


(+0) -21


(+0) -21


(+0) 19


(+2) 9


(+30) 22


(+43)


Effect of individual recommendation Extinguishment safety -33


People


(+0) -33


(+0) -33


(+0) -33


(+0) -33


(+0) -33


(+0) -33


(+0) -33


(+0) -33


(+0) -33


(+0) -33


(+0) -33


(+0) 27


(+6) -33


(+0) -33


(+0) -3


(+30) 3


(+36)


(+0) -12


(+0) -12


(+0) -12


(+0) -12


(+0) -9


(+3) -12


(+0) -9


(+3) -12


(+0) -11


(+1) -12


(+0) -10


(+2) -5


(+7) -12


(+0) -12


(+0) 3


(+15) 19


(+31)


General


movement safety -12


59


(+0) 59


(+0) 59


(+0) 59


(+0) 59


(+0) 62


(+3) 59


(+0) 72


(+13) 67


(+8) 60


(+1) 59


(+0) 61


(+2) 66


(+7) 59


(+0) 61


(+2) 89


(+30) 115


(+56)





42


IFHE DIGEST 2015


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