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BUILDING DESIGN Guillermo Brunzini – Architect, Brunzini Arquitectos & Asociados


Sustainable design for city based centre


In this article the author looks at a recent design undertaken by Brunzini Arquitectos & Asociados which employs a variety of sustainable design strategies.


The CITO eye research and treatment center is a specialised ophthalmology facility for ocular treatment and investigation. The project owner and director is Dr. Fabio Bartucci, a renowned Buenos Aires-based ophthalmologist. The site location, being so highly dense, offered many sustainable benefits to the occupants of the building, with good access to public transport, supermarkets, restaurants and other resources which has reduced the need for both employees and patients to travel to the facility by car. The project has been designed over nine


levels with cultural and leisure activities being housed on the ground floor. Consultation rooms are on both the second and third floors; a special area for patient recovery is on the fourth floor and there are three floors for surgical practice, leaving the upper levels for staff-use only. An art gallery has also been incorporated into the design to provide the facility with an interesting cultural focus. With an approximate area of 2,000 m2


project integrates many sustainable design strategies, including protection of the environment during the construction stage, energy reduction, and the care of the indoor air quality to ensure maximised occupant comfort. Due to the dense site location the


decision was made to not install car parking within the site and this has helped reduce pollution while minimising land development impact. Further, a decision was also made not to install mains gas at the facility in an attempt to reduce the environmental impact caused by the use of fossil fuels. The morphology of the façade, being


iconic and referential, is materialised in concrete and glass, responding to the diverse needs of natural illumination for interior function. It features a larger glazed area on the lower level public areas, which decreases as it moves toward the upper surgical levels –


48


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The building façade features large glazed areas on the lower level public areas, which decreases as it moves toward the upper surgical levels – which are less reliant on natural lighting.


which are less reliant on natural lighting. The project is already registered with the


Green Building Certification Institute (GBCI) for LEED Certification under the NCV3 2009 format and is aiming to reach the ‘GOLD’ certification standard.


Greening the site Because site conditions did not allow for the establishment of vegetation on the grounds, the second floor terrace was devoted to a semi-intensive green roof that provides all the benefits of a green open space, and serving as a place of respite for patients and staff. Native and foreign vegetation was selected for this area taking


into account the fact that no permanent irrigation is to be provided after plant establishment period. The hottest months of the year in Buenos Aires coincide with the rainy season – which occurs from December


Guillermo Brunzini


Guillermo Brunzini, RA, LEED AP is the founder and principal of Brunzini Arquitectos & Asociados (BAAS). He has been involved in the design and construction management of all the projects. BAAS recently obtained the first LEED (Green building leadership) Gold New Construction certified in Argentina.


Guillermo has 23 years of international experience in different scale and project types and has completed over 250,000 m2


of space, mainly in Argentina


IFHE DIGEST 2015


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