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HEALTH ENVIRONMENT


Bernard Tong – Project Manager, Alberta Health Services Eugene Malo – Member of the Cross Cancer Institute’s Volunteer Association legacy project


Healing garden project for cancer centre


Personal testimonials from cancer survivors have supported the proposition that green space has the potential to profoundly benefit patients and those who provide for their care and comfort.


On 17 September 2013 an outdoor healing garden at the Cross Cancer Institute (CCI) in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada was officially opened. The Cross Cancer Institute is a


comprehensive cancer centre for northern Alberta and a lead centre for the province- wide prevention, research and treatment program. The facility provides advanced medical and supportive cancer care, patient and professional education, and conducts research through the Alberta Cancer Research Institute.


The project began early in 2012, when


members of the Cross Cancer Institute Volunteer Association (CCIVA) – a group of approximately 350 volunteers – resolved to launch a Healing Garden Project in commemoration of a 50 year legacy of fulfilling a mandate to enhance patient care and comfort at the CCI. A planning committee was formed to spearhead dialogue and stakeholder engagement, which were pivotal in advancing the project amid competing challenges of allocating donation dollars effectively and appropriately.


Lack of available space Virtually all space at the CCI was reserved for future cancer care program expansion. The only available space for such as area was a 640 m2


corner of the site. The challenge was to


transform this mundane space which is flanked by a parking lot, an ambulance bay and driveways, into a pleasant, barrier free garden: complete with a pergola, ergonomic seating, a feature wall, planting beds, and colour concrete paving; all artfully arranged into a symphony of lines, curves, circles, planes and forms. Project volunteers engaged an architect in


area of lawn situated in the northwest


February 2012 to lead a team of engineers, a landscape architect and a cost consultant to prepare conceptual sketches and feasibility studies. With the endorsement of the CCI’s executives and Alberta Health Services (AHS), CCIVA was able to fast track design and tender documents and call bids in September 2012. AHS Edmonton Zone Project Management was tasked in May 2012, as the project manager, to expedite project execution. The volunteers involved were mindful of


both initial and ongoing maintenance costs of the project. Many considerations needed to be addressed such as patient and visitor barrier-free accessibility, interactive design elements, features that best engage various senses of patients and visitors, environmental, security and facilities maintenance impacts. For every consideration explored and resolved, the scope and cost of the project increased. Project design was approved on


Bernard Tong


Bernard Tong is a Project Manager at Alberta Health Services.


Eugene Malo


‘The challenge was to transform this mundane space which is flanked by a parking lot, an ambulance bay and driveways, into a pleasant, barrier free garden.’


72


Eugene Malo is a member of the Cross Cancer Institute’s Volunteer Association legacy project.


IFHE DIGEST 2015


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