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FACILITY DESIGN


Arrive


Report to reception


Pre-consultation procedures/tests


See consultant


Post-consultation procedures/tests


Analysis of daily activity to identify opportunities to optimise clinic timetable; Dynamic modelling of patient processes in an outpatient department to assess performance.


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Consult Wait


Nurse Scan


In-patient orthopaedic hospital We used agent-based simulations to support optioneering of the design proposals for this new orthopaedic hospital. The hospital will comprise three in-patient wards with a total of 124 beds. By applying modelling at this early stage for the new build, we were able to make significant cost-savings in the design. Due to the nature of their condition,


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Wednesday Week C


various sources, including anonymised A&E records, detailing each patient’s journey through the department with timestamps for each activity. CCTV footage from Friday and Saturday evenings was also used to extract the arrival profiles of patients with visitors to the department during peak times. The outputs of this modelling exercise


illustrated that adopting a RAT strategy would improve the performance of the department with respect to some of the KPIs. For example, average total time in the department reduced and major beds capacity improved. However, the modelling also highlighted that in other


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areas this strategy actually performed worse than the existing Triage strategy, in particular the density in the main waiting area increased as patients had a longer wait at the start of the journey to be seen by the RAT consultant. By carrying out this modelling exercise


we enabled the Trust to predict and compare the impact of different options in a holistic manner with respect to key performance indicators and thereby make informed decisions about the future of the department.


orthopaedic patients tend to exhibit unique behaviours and movements that need to be considered when designing an orthopaedic hospital. For example, patients are likely to have restricted mobility and will, therefore, be transported on beds more often than some other patient groups. To understand the complex activities and behaviours that occur in such a hospital we worked closely with the medical planners to define the likely patient, visitor and staff movements. Working together we defined the expected occupancy of each ward and number of admissions and discharges per day based on average length of stay. We also derived the typical frequency of patient visits to key activities including treatment, therapy, diagnostics, surgery and social spaces. This information was used to build a


dynamic model of the whole hospital to simulate detailed activity patterns and movements of patients, medical staff, FM staff and visitors. Through simulating a typical day


IFHE DIGEST 2015


Average number of patients per half-day


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