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ENERGY EFFICIENCY


blocks, etc.), allow the model to be approached both from the energy-related features and the functional point of view, as the EeB parameters are defined in the lower level of the single spaces (level 1), while the functional ones are defined in the upper level of building and district (level 3 and level 4). Therefore, the methodology follows these


steps: • Definition of a common breakdown of the Healthcare Districts and Hospital buildings in units.


• Identification of the units with relation to the layers approach categories.


• Breakdown of each unit in single spaces to be codified.


• Implementation of the technical properties and energy-related features referred to the spaces and the units.


• Definition of typologies based on the functional aggregative configurations of the units in the buildings and in the districts.


Conclusion The traditional design process is very time consuming and often inaccurate because it collects and converts the evidence and tacit knowledge regarding clinical protocols, patient’s experience and expert’s advice through consultations, focus groups, and quality circles. There are substantial difficulties in the design interpretation, communication and decision-making involving many different stakeholders. In spite of a solid track-record in the field of healthcare building design, the existing approach remains subjective and full of uncertainties. It is difficult to comprehensively gain the knowledge of the energy use and energy reduction potentials per typology from the descriptions and


specifications of the healthcare processes and equipment, which are widely available. STREAMER design methodologies will


turn around the existing approach – the starting point will be the validated solutions, not the unknowns. Decision-making will be based on inclusiveness in the design phase of both new and retrofitting projects, from the initial brief to the final design implementation. It is necessary to incorporate two unique ways of looking at the energy calculation in order to get a least a chance to reduce the energy consumption by 50%. At inter-building, neighbourhood and


urban levels, the typological meta-design will be used in order to define the most effective strategy for energy-efficiency improvements depending on factors, such as: environmental and urban scale; climate zones and geographical orientation; user’s profile and demography. Healthcare districts will be classified based on the analysis of European legislation, practices, and renewal programmes (high intensity care hospitals, primary care hospitals, houses for elderly, hospices, etc.).


Acknowledgements The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community’s Seventh Framework Programme under Grant Agreement No. 608739 (Project STREAMER).


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Providing insights into the vast field of healthcare engineering and facility management


IFHE DIGEST 2015 27


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