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Wayfarer Toes in the Sand By Kathryne Grisim Isla Mujeres’ North Beach.


have returned to the island for ten consecutive years! True enough, the island is small. You can see it all with a taxi ride or a golf cart tour. You could easily bike the en- tire island or run it, as my brother-in-law likes to do on his birthday. Some parts of Isla Mujeres are so narrow that you can see both sides of the island at the same time. If you are fortunate enough to stay at one of these points, you can enjoy both breath-taking sunrises and sunsets from one vantage point. Tere are a bevy of attractions on the island such as Dol-


T


phin Discovery, a sea turtle farm, a pirate’s estate, catamaran tours, snorkel excursions or a day of deep-sea fishing, all of which I have no inkling to do. So what on earth do we do on an Isla Mujeres vacation? We are up early to fix a pot of coffee and sit out by the


The chairs on our terrace give a glimpse of heaven. 58 • Winter 2015


azure Caribbean Sea and watch the sun peek up over the distant horizon. My husband often heads into Centro soon after, to witness the town coming to life, pick up the news- paper that has just arrived at the ferry dock and perhaps sit for another cup of joe at Bally Hoo, a dock restaurant where the sailors like to gather before they set out for the day. In the mean while, I will don my bathing suit and waterproof sandals and head out along the coral shore to hunt for heart shape stones, pure white conch shells or sea glass of cobalt blue and sea foam green. At lunch time, there are almost always leftovers from sup- pers of the previous evening because portions are plentiful, but if not, we may make our own tortas of manchego cheese, lime mayonnaise, cucumber and cilantro and head to North


The Hub


ourists who have visited the island of Isla Mujeres as day-trippers often wonder what “islaholics”, as we are dubbed, do there for an entire week. Even my own circle of friends are baffled as to why I


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