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OMG they did it again! Chris and Larry are back making a splash in the candy market.


“As you grow as a company, you try to enhance every prod-


uct, and appeal to a broader customer base,” explains Fred. With more than 50 varieties of chocolates, toasted coconut marshmallows, caramels, fudge, brittles, barks and roasted nuts, it is quite the job. Te company’s signature Russian mints may well be one of their most sought after confections, a rich combination of milk chocolate and peppermint oil. To- day, this award-winning product has become an international sensation with several orders having travelled overseas. But, while the company may be expanding, Mordens’ remains a family business with relatives and long-time staff still work- ing alongside Fred.


Clodhoppers and OMG’s In 1996, high school friends, Chris Emery and Larry


Finnson, packaged a family recipe made by Chris’s grand- mother. Tey named the treats Clodhoppers and marketed them under their Winnipeg company; Kraves Candy Co.


Clodhoppers were available in vanilla, chocolate, dark choco- late fudge, and peanut butter, a flavour that was later discon- tinued. Two years later, they began distributing the candies to Wal-Mart, and by 2006 they were selling millions throughout North America. Clodhoppers were a success on a major scale. Later that year the duo sold their assets to Brookside Foods. Six years later the pair showed up on the Dragon’s Den, with their new product, OMG’s Candy. According to Chris and Larry, OMG’s are delicious chocolaty graham clusters mixed with toffee bits, almonds or peanuts with a taste that will leave you saying “OMG!” Tough by all means not an inclusive list, these are some of


Winnipeg’s popular confectionary companies that have im- pacted the chocolate and candy making business in our city and across the country. If we’ve missed someone or if you can fill in some history please let us know!


Paulin-Chambers Company Ltd.


John Hudson Chambers moved to Winnipeg from Peterborough in 1882. With a back- ground in manufacturing he soon opened up the Chambers Steam Biscuit Factory; making his first batch of biscuits on May 18, 1876. The company, later renamed the Paulin-Chambers Company Ltd., began construction on a factory, located at 311 Ross Ave. Original construction was completed in 1899, however, the building was enlarged twice, and a sixth storey later added to the entire structure as the demand for their confectionary products increased.


Some of the company’s most popular items included Paulin’s Chocolate Puffs, Cuban Lunch, Pie Face and Fat Emma bars. Their Satin Finish and Fine Hard Candy red tins with the bison medallions, should you have any lying around, could fetch up to $200 at auction.


Although Paulin-Chambers Co. Ltd. is now closed you can still delight in the flavour of their famous Cuban Lunch bars with this recipe.


Cuban Lunch bars 2 c. peanut butter chips 2 c. butterscotch chips 2 c. chocolate chips 1 1/2 c. rippled potato chips, crushed 1 1/2 c. peanuts, chopped (salted or unsalted)


Melt peanut butter, butterscotch and chocolate chips together over low heat until smooth. Remove from heat and add crushed potato chips and peanuts. Mix well. Spoon the mixture onto wax paper or into a greased muffin tin until hardened.


If you prefer these a little less sweet, use four cups of peanut butter chips and omit the butterscotch chips.


Coco-Cuban Lunch bars: Substitute coconut for potato chips.


These sweet and salty chocolate treats will bring back a taste of the past.


24 • Winter 2015


Source: Recipe from Donna Peck-Harland, Kirkfield Park United Church, Winnipeg.


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