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The future of chocolate in Winnipeg


Cherry white chocolate signature bar.


Constance Menzies, and her team are chocolatiers in a class all their own. Located in St. Boniface, along the busy Provencher Boulevard you’ll find her popular shop. Constance may be a relative newcomer on the confection- ary scene compared to those with century-long histories, but she is a force to be reckoned with.


True artisans, Constance and her small, highly trained team concoct mouth-watering delicacies. Each piece is created entirely by hand. Whole, organic ingredients are combined in house to develop the natural flavours that her chocolates are known for. “We buy premium grade chocolate, including single origin and single plantation chocolate,” Constance explains.


While the shop’s Prairie cow pies, Manitobars and similar favourites are addictively delicious, it is the handmade


enrobed chocolates and hand painted, three dimensional pieces that are a true reflection of the team’s artistry in creating chocolates that are as wonderful to eat as they are to look at. Visitors to her shop will be wowed by the edible beauty within.


Constance is constantly taking part in prominent new projects and adding new flavours to her core chocolates keeping Winnipeggers and visitors alike coming back for more. She has aligned herself with the 103rd Grey Cup, Canadian Museum for Human Rights, Winnipeg Art Gallery, 2010 Vancouver Olympics, 2014 Junos, Oscars, Golden Globes, Royal visits among others creating unique products to share and promote Manitoba through choco- late. Constance’s creations, and she herself, are enmeshed within Winnipeg’s culture and she will take her place, in a class all her own, within Winnipeg’s sweet history.


Ray Tara, chocolatier. Constance Popp’s


gorgeous and original, 3D Canadian Museum for Human Rights ChocoMonument.


thehubwinnipeg.com


Winter 2015 • 25


Photo by Leif Norman.


Photo by Leif Norman. Photo by Leif Norman.


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