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tions for CPR next to the pool, along with a phone. • Small children and non-swimmers should wear a personal fl otation device (PFD) while in or around a pool or other open body of water, or on a boat. (Note that infl atable armbands and inner tubes are not PFDs.) • Take kids only to beaches and pools that have a lifeguard on duty.


Education • Be sure that you and all other caregivers learn CPR. • Educate your kids about general water safety. Instruct them to: Avoid diving into a pool of un- known depth or any open body of water; swim with an adult present; wear a PFD while swimming in open water or while participating in any water sports. • Enroll your children in swimming lessons — that include emergency water survival techniques — by age four. • Teach your children to never enter the water to help a drowning victim. Instead, call for help and throw something to the victim that will either reach or fl oat to her. • Learn to identify a child in distress. Drowning children are unable to call out


Ready, Set, Grow


Many safety precautions taken when near dogs should apply with cats as well


or wave for help. Often, they are also unable to move toward a rescuer, or reach for a piece of rescue equipment. Victims remain on the surface for 20 to 60 seconds before submerging. Drown- ing victims lose consciousness after two minutes of submersion in water, and brain damage can occur within four to six minutes of submersion. • If you think a child is in distress, ask “are you okay?” If he is unable to respond, call for help and call 911. If you are not a trained res- cuer, attempt to use a shepherd’s hook, a long pole, or a throw rope attached to a buoyant object (PFD or life ring)


to reach him, and then pull him to shore or the edge of the pool. Assess whether or not he is still breathing, and begin rescue breathing or CPR as needed, if you are trained. Have the victim checked by medical personnel.


Animal Bites In the U.S., dogs bite four million people every year, and 60 percent of those bitten are under the age of 18. Other common animal bites are those by cats (400,000 annually) and snakes (45,000 annually). T e Centers


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