This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
4. Cereal Plays a Key Role in Managing Healthy Body Weights


Regular cereal eaters, including children, tend to have lower body mass indices, are less likely to be overweight and have more positive nutrient intake profiles than those who eat cereal less frequentlyvi.


Because the average serving of Kellogg’s® cereal with ½ cup of fat-free milk contains 150 calo- ries (9 percent of the recommended daily intake of 1,650 calories for U.S. kids age 6-11), cereal with milk is a relatively low-calorie option that makes a nutritious meal.


Similar to children, adults (men and women age 35 to 64) who consume cereal at least every other day have more healthful BMIs and also are less likely to be overweight or obesevi.


5. Less Than 5 Percent of Sugar Consumed by U.S. Kids Comes From Cereal


Kellogg has recently decreased the sugar in our top-selling U.S. kids’ cereals by approximately 20 percent, or 2-3 grams per serving. The sugar in cereal contributes about 50 calories or less, and cereal has less sugar than other breakfast foods, such as fruit-flavored yogurtv,vii. And we’re continually updating our products to meet consumers’ taste and health needs.


6. Cereal Contains Less Than Half the Sodium of Other Popular Breakfast Foods


Sodium from ready-to-eat cereals contributes about 2 percent of total sodium in the U.S. dietv. In addition, cereal contains less than half the sodium of other popular breakfast items, like bagels, toast and croissantsvii. Even so, we’re finding ways to reduce the sodium in our products. From 2007 through 2010, Kellogg reduced the average amount of sodium per serving in our ready-to-eat cereals in our core marketsviii by 13 percent.


While these are compelling facts that we hope you find helpful, there’s an even bigger story to tell at www.kelloggvideos.com. There you will find our Cereal: The Complete Story research compendium and short informative videos featuring top nutrition experts.


Cereal: Story


The Complete


We also invite you to sign up for the Kellogg Know Network Newsletter — this tool, developed for the nutrition community, connects you with all the resources of Kellogg’s Nutrition™, including product and program news, new research findings, industry insights and education materials. We hope you will continue the conversation and contact us with questions or comments at Know@kellogg.com.


i Kellogg “Breakfast Rush Hour” Survey, Feb. 2011.


ii Kellogg Audit of National Breakfast Cereals, Sept. 2010. Data was drawn from label, website and a syndicated database and includes nationally distributed ready-to-eat cereals from Kellogg, General Mills, Post, Quaker and Malt-O-Meal.


iii Archives of Internal Medicine, Feb. 2011. iv 2010 U.S. Dietary Guidelines. v NHANES, 2003-2006.


vi Journal of the American Dietetic Assoc., 2003, 2009. vii U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, 2009. www.ars.usda.gov/nutrientdata. viii U.S., Canada, Mexico, United Kingdom, France, and Australia.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124