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Education


• Reminisce about your childhood. You loved summertime as a child just as much as your kids do now. T ink about what you enjoyed then that can serve as a learning activity today. • Take learning on the road. T ere are numerous road signs passed on your travels down the highways and byways. One learning activity is getting your chil- dren to read those signs out loud as well as to write them. T e writing activity can be utilized even with day-to-day travels in your local neighborhood. • Visit local venues. Most cities have several local venues that hold great learn- ing opportunities, including the local farmers and fl ea markets, the zoo, state parks, museums and theaters. T e farm- ers market is an excellent place to teach your children about fresh produce, while the fl ea market can be used to explore various cultures and artwork. State parks off er science and social studies-related learning opportunities.


• Explore summer camp. Many summer camps off er various learning op- portunities all summer long. Camps help develop social skills and provide oppor- tunities for physical activity. Check with your local YMCA, churches, colleges and newspapers for information. Remember that summertime activi- ties should be fun, simple and educa- tional. Healthcare providers, guidance counselors and teachers serve as great resources, and may be able to supply you with other fun educational ideas. It’s important to keep stimulating the brain so that knowledge does not slide away during the summer break.


Tedra L. Simmons, DNP, PNP-PC, is a nursing instructor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and a PNP at Children’s of Alabama.


What learning activities are you plan- ning? E-mail us.editor@cwcomms.com.


Family trips are a great opportunity to take learning on the road


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