This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Child Skincare


walk in a wooded area. Do not burn poison ivy in a campfi re.


Some people are sensitive to urushiol and can have an allergic reaction by inhaling the burning oil. T e inhaled oil reacts with the lining of the lungs, causing extreme pain and possibly fatal respiratory distress. Ingest- ing poison ivy also can be fatal.


Treating Poison Ivy Here are ways to help ease the discomfort of poison ivy.


Oatmeal Baths Oatmeal baths can soothe itching. You can fi nd several types at your local supermarket, or you can make one yourself. Put 1/2 cup of oatmeal into a cotton sock with 1/2 cup of baking soda, then tie the sock and toss it into the bathtub while the water is running. Note that oatmeal can make the tub slippery.


Burrow's Solution Burrow’s solution was invented in the mid- 1800s by Karl Burrow, an ophthalmologist. A preparation made of aluminum acetate dissolved in water, it serves as an astringent and has antibacterial properties. You can use it to treat poison ivy dermatitis by applying cold compresses of Burrow’s solution over the aff ected area three times a day.


Poison Ivy Wash You can fi nd a topical solution for treating poison ivy at your local pharmacy that


78


To help ease the discomfort of poison ivy, try an oatmeal bath, which can soothe the itching


actually removes urushiol from your skin. T is poison ivy wash binds itself to the urushiol so it can be eff ectively washed away. Although a rash may still be visible for a few days, the pain and itching are relieved immediately.


Insect Safety We can’t escape insects when spending time outside, but we can prevent being stung or bitten. Insects are attracted to bright colors, fragrance and standing water. T erefore, if you wear your favorite per- fume or lotion on a camping trip, insects may mistake you for a delicious fl ower! To protect against uncomfortable stings, always wear an insect repellent when outdoors. Products with ten-percent DEET will give you protection for up to three hours and may be applied up to three times a day. However, it is always a good idea to wash the repellent off after coming indoors. Insect repellents should not be used on infants younger than two months of age, and should be used with caution on infants two to six months of age. Do not apply the repellent to the face and hands,


www.readysetgrowmag.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124