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Family Pl trNuanitingion


high. A child needs to be able to reach the plants, to weed and to water without walking in the bed. Container gardens (clay pots, an old coff ee can or plastic containers) are great for kids who don’t have a backyard or community garden. Pots need adequate soil for plant growth, a drainage hole and frequent watering. Remember, you should be the facilita- tor for your young gardeners by showing them how to plant seeds or seedlings, as well as how to weed, prune and water. In the garden, kids will learn how


seeds sprout and grow. Remind them that not all seeds germinate. Bugs in the garden are part of the ecosystem. Kids love bugs and enjoy watching their work habits and habitats. Kids are most curious about insects, worms and grubs. T ey are not afraid of insects unless they learn fear from adults. You should encourage and teach them about all creatures in the garden with humor, wonder and respect. Gardening tools should be kid-friendly and safe, and children should be respon- sible for cleaning and storing the tools. A small, plastic storage bin near the garden will allow for easy access and encourage a


The garden should be accessible easily, and kids should be able to work in the space with ease as well


daily gardening routine. Also, there needs to be a convenient water source — such as a hose or bucket to fi ll — available to the young gardeners. Plants that grow quickly and are easy for kids to cultivate and pick include


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