This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Your child’s doctor may recommend a 2nd dose of VARIVAX® (Varicella Virus Vaccine Live) to help protect against chickenpox.


Talk to your child’s doctor or health care professional today.


Official recommendations for shots Your doctor or health care provider will use the official recommendations to decide the number of shots needed and when to get them. If a dose is missed, your health care provider will let you know when your child should have it.


Ask about VARIVAX VARIVAX is a live virus vaccine that is given as a shot. VARIVAX is meant to help prevent chickenpox, which is also known as varicella, in people 12 months of age and older.


Important information about VARIVAX Your child should not get VARIVAX if he or she is allergic to any of its ingredients including gelatin and neomycin; has a weakened immune system, such as an immune deficiency, an inherited immune disorder, leukemia, lymphoma, or HIV/AIDS; takes high doses of steroids by mouth or in a shot; has active tuberculosis that is not treated; has a fever; is pregnant or plans to get pregnant within the next 3 months.


Your child should not take aspirin or aspirin-containing products for 6 weeks after getting VARIVAX.


VARIVAX may not protect everyone who gets it. VARIVAX does not treat chickenpox once your child has it.


VARIVAX is given as a shot to people who are 12 months old or older. If your child is 12 months to 12 years old and your doctor gives a second dose, the second dose must be given at least 3 months after the first shot.


A second dose should be given to those who first get the vaccine when they are 13 years old or older. This second dose should be given 4 to 8 weeks after the first dose.


The most common side effects reported after taking VARIVAX are fever; pain, swelling, itching, or redness at the site of the shot; chickenpox-like rash on the body or at the site of the shot; irritability. Other less common side effects have also been reported, such as tingling of the skin and shingles.


Only your doctor can decide if VARIVAX is right for your child.


You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088. For more information, please read the Patient Product Information adjacent to this page.


Copyright © 2011 Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp., a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. All rights reserved. VACC-1011557-0000 09/11


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124